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 Forum index » House Training » Users ( For the regulars )
Cloud Computing
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edmont

Joined: 19 Nov 2012
Posts: 38

PostPosted: Tue 11 Nov 2014, 23:13    Post subject:  Cloud Computing
Subject description: Free remote computing , virtual machines .
 

Well , does puppy linux have the capability to utilize these resources ;
if available .

I notice something called rackspace , I've used sage online ; however
I'm wondering if I can get at computing resources without having to
go through a third party .

I want computing power , large memory , no inappropriate timeouts
and an easy way to upload and run my programs.

Any suggestions .
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mikeslr


Joined: 16 Jun 2008
Posts: 2007
Location: 500 seconds from Sol

PostPosted: Thu 13 Nov 2014, 13:33    Post subject: What do you mean by "Cloud Computing"?  

Hi edmont,

I'm not sure I understand your use of the term "Cloud Computing". Like the phrase "speaks English" it may mean different things to different people.
1. If by "Cloud Computing" you mean 'access programs which are already on the web that you can run on your computer via your Internet Browser', see my post on sszindian's thread, "Cloud Computing For Every Puppy", http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=808554#808554. You'll find a link to his pet on the first post on that thread. The thread is short and provides advice and links for maximizing the pet's utility.
Your post stimulated my exploration. So thank you for that. I posted because other's may be interested in the continued viability of sszindian's pet, or stimulate their interest in the expanded capabilities it provides to Puppies.
2. If you mean "upload" and "download" data to your online blog or other webspace, than there are pets and perhaps SFSes for that purpose, such as gFTP which comes installed, I believe, in every Pup. See your Internet menu. As some people have complained about some problems with it, and I run Wine on almost all my Pups, I personally prefer XP's FileZilla portable. I install it to a folder on my Home Partition. It can be run from there by clicking its executable. Or see this link for creating a Menu listing. http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=686845&search_id=1433209281. I think the last version of Filezilla built for Pups was specifically built for Lupu. But perhaps Carolina may have one. I don't know whether older versions of Filezilla will run under "newer" Pups.
3. If you mean does "Puppy" --in the broadest sense-- provide space on the web for you to store and run your own applications, then the simple answer is "NO."
4. Your references to rackspace and Sage online suggest that storing and running your own applications using and from webspace and via the operational facilities provided by some organization is what you desire. So your question may mean can Puppy access such webspace and utilize such services. To answer that, we'd have to know further information, such as how you utilized Sage online in the past: Were you required to download and install some application? Do you know if such downloaded application ran under any version of Linux, or a Linux version could be downloaded? Or is it as simple as using a browser and logging in?

mikesLr

Last edited by mikeslr on Thu 13 Nov 2014, 13:41; edited 1 time in total
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Semme


Joined: 07 Aug 2011
Posts: 7775
Location: World_Hub

PostPosted: Thu 13 Nov 2014, 13:35    Post subject:  

This is for the folks here who aren't yet up to speed >> http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/private-cloud-real-cloud
Quote:
According to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), cloud computing is a model for enabling convenient, ubiquitous and on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources, such as servers, networks, storage, applications and services, that can be provisioned and de-provisioned rapidly with minimal management effort or service-provider interaction.

And one <dated> article for the road >> How to create your own cloud with Linux

_________________
>>> Living with the immediacy of death helps you sort out your priorities. It helps you live a life less trivial <<<
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mikeslr


Joined: 16 Jun 2008
Posts: 2007
Location: 500 seconds from Sol

PostPosted: Thu 13 Nov 2014, 16:21    Post subject: Cloud Computing -- Nice References Semme  

Semme wrote:
This is for the folks here who aren't yet up to speed
"
followed by links to two excellent articles. Thanks, Semme, from someone who probably never be up to speed when it comes to Cloud Computing. But then, I've been psychologically attuned to protect things I rather not expose. Not that I have anything to hide. I just question the sensibilities of an entire generation's evaluation of the value of privacy.
Recently at a townhall meeting someone complained about the camera which had been placed on an intersection's traffic light. He considered it a violation of his "right to privacy." As if the founders of the U.S. had written the 4th Amendment to require the government to avert its eyes as Lady Godiva rode by.
The Fourth Amendment's "Right to Privacy" was among the first of the Federal Constitutional Rights imposed upon the States.
For seven years I served as an Assistant Prosecutor of an urban county. Among my main responsibilities were to train local police as to what they could and could not lawfully do in acquiring evidence of crime; to defend in courts the evidence seized against claims that the Constitution had been violated; and to provide legal support and guidance to three departments within that Prosecutor's Office. These were established to combat organized crime, narcotics trafficking and municipal corruption; and among their tools was the use of wire-tapping and other forms of electronic surveillance.
Until the development of "data mining" I saw little reason for the average citizen to worry about the behavior of governments. Not because they are predisposed to be benign; but because they lacked the resources to be otherwise. It is a question of power. Manpower costs money --the tool we use to distribute power. Obtaining a warrant required the expenditure of some of that power. But far more would have to be spent in execution of a warrant authorizing electronic surveillance.
As one of our detectives assigned to such execution complained:
"Well, we sat around for two days. When a phone call was made or came in we had to turn on the recorder and make an entry in the log. Then we had to listen to the conversation and --as the warrant specified-- if within 5 minutes the conversation didn't turn to something sinister, we'd turn the recorder off, make another entry in the log and wait for the next phone call." Note the "we." Execution required that two detectives be assigned for various legal and biological reasons.

Not a bad use of government resources, if governments had unlimited taxing powers and considered "feather-bedding" an appropriate socio-economic application of the taxes it collected.

Not a week goes by without someone announcing the discovery of security a hole in applications we use to access the internet; breaches by which criminals, well funded criminal organizations, or countries opposed to our way of life could, and perhaps already have, gained access to information we thought was "private."
And then there's Google. An institution having more power than most countries, and all but a handful of the States of the United States. Google, with whom we share our most intimate thoughts. Google which unlike our duly elected representatives who are sworn to protect our rights, is obligated to those who desire to profit from us. Google now run by honorable men, but whose shares --and therefore whose control-- is on the open market. Google, who unlike most of the 350 Million +/-. "persons", entitled to Constitutional protection is immortal. Google, a corporation seeking as much power as it can obtain in the emerging Age of Corporate Feudalism.

Democracy, with its enshrinement of the rights of the individual, will not succumb to threats or physical confrontations. Rather, it will wither and die because people do not understand how power is organized, gained and lost.

Sorry about the rant.

mikesLr
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edmont

Joined: 19 Nov 2012
Posts: 38

PostPosted: Sun 23 Nov 2014, 04:44    Post subject: Remote Desktop
Subject description: RD then the Cloud
 

As a first step to remote computing perhaps the remote desktop
software that is available via the puppy linux package manager
is worth utilizing.

I downloaded some information from a cloud provider , who also
offers a remote desktop option , without timeout.
The software to enable this and the cloud connection is known as Citrix , a windows executable that doesn't appear to run under Wine
on Puppy Precise 5.7.1 .

The remote connection to Sage was via a website , known as
Sage Cloud .
They have TeraBytes of memory and heaps of virtual machines ,
however the timeout limitation is quite annoying .
Perhaps they're sorting this out , last time they were in a
state of flux.
Timeout in these instances refers to the remote computer limiting
how long your computation can run there.
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edmont

Joined: 19 Nov 2012
Posts: 38

PostPosted: Tue 17 Oct 2017, 15:48    Post subject: Re: Cloud Computing -- Nice References Semme
Subject description: Interesting article
 

The distribution of knowledge and how it's manipulated also impedes
the dissemination of vital information and ones ability to function as a
rational , responsible , person of whatever ideal cause one might want to
aspire to .

Wikipedia doesn't appear to be as impartial as one might initially imagine.


I find that I'm always reluctant to provide details about myself over the internet , simply because I'm concerned that my notions might be deemed
unacceptable by some corporate or political interest. As the internet is
worldwide , you're bound to be offensive to someone , somewhere .

You are most likely aware of the need to regulate corporations in your
country ; in my country the infrastructure for doing so isn't always available.
As a nation and peoples we aren't particularly vocal about important issues.









mikeslr wrote:
Semme wrote:
This is for the folks here who aren't yet up to speed
"
followed by links to two excellent articles. Thanks, Semme, from someone who probably never be up to speed when it comes to Cloud Computing. But then, I've been psychologically attuned to protect things I rather not expose. Not that I have anything to hide. I just question the sensibilities of an entire generation's evaluation of the value of privacy.
Recently at a townhall meeting someone complained about the camera which had been placed on an intersection's traffic light. He considered it a violation of his "right to privacy." As if the founders of the U.S. had written the 4th Amendment to require the government to avert its eyes as Lady Godiva rode by.
The Fourth Amendment's "Right to Privacy" was among the first of the Federal Constitutional Rights imposed upon the States.
For seven years I served as an Assistant Prosecutor of an urban county. Among my main responsibilities were to train local police as to what they could and could not lawfully do in acquiring evidence of crime; to defend in courts the evidence seized against claims that the Constitution had been violated; and to provide legal support and guidance to three departments within that Prosecutor's Office. These were established to combat organized crime, narcotics trafficking and municipal corruption; and among their tools was the use of wire-tapping and other forms of electronic surveillance.
Until the development of "data mining" I saw little reason for the average citizen to worry about the behavior of governments. Not because they are predisposed to be benign; but because they lacked the resources to be otherwise. It is a question of power. Manpower costs money --the tool we use to distribute power. Obtaining a warrant required the expenditure of some of that power. But far more would have to be spent in execution of a warrant authorizing electronic surveillance.
As one of our detectives assigned to such execution complained:
"Well, we sat around for two days. When a phone call was made or came in we had to turn on the recorder and make an entry in the log. Then we had to listen to the conversation and --as the warrant specified-- if within 5 minutes the conversation didn't turn to something sinister, we'd turn the recorder off, make another entry in the log and wait for the next phone call." Note the "we." Execution required that two detectives be assigned for various legal and biological reasons.

Not a bad use of government resources, if governments had unlimited taxing powers and considered "feather-bedding" an appropriate socio-economic application of the taxes it collected.

Not a week goes by without someone announcing the discovery of security a hole in applications we use to access the internet; breaches by which criminals, well funded criminal organizations, or countries opposed to our way of life could, and perhaps already have, gained access to information we thought was "private."
And then there's Google. An institution having more power than most countries, and all but a handful of the States of the United States. Google, with whom we share our most intimate thoughts. Google which unlike our duly elected representatives who are sworn to protect our rights, is obligated to those who desire to profit from us. Google now run by honorable men, but whose shares --and therefore whose control-- is on the open market. Google, who unlike most of the 350 Million +/-. "persons", entitled to Constitutional protection is immortal. Google, a corporation seeking as much power as it can obtain in the emerging Age of Corporate Feudalism.

Democracy, with its enshrinement of the rights of the individual, will not succumb to threats or physical confrontations. Rather, it will wither and die because people do not understand how power is organized, gained and lost.

Sorry about the rant.

mikesLr
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