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 Forum index » House Training » HOWTO ( Solutions )
DebianDog HowTo thread
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saintless


Joined: 11 Jun 2011
Posts: 3014
Location: Bulgaria

PostPosted: Wed 30 Apr 2014, 02:32    Post subject:  DebianDog HowTo thread
Subject description: Tips, tricks and solutions for Debian in general
 

In this thread I will start adding information in separate posts about using Debian Live (and special DebianDog info different from Debian Live) in a way similar to Puppy + any useful tips we can find. The information here will be linked to DebianDog thread first page posts:
http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?t=93225

Some of the information will be added from http://foxyroxylinux.com since it is already available from JBV and me there and is valid all the way for DebianDog.

The first 3 posts will describe boot and save file options for DebianDog.

Toni

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Last edited by saintless on Thu 01 May 2014, 12:09; edited 2 times in total
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saintless


Joined: 11 Jun 2011
Posts: 3014
Location: Bulgaria

PostPosted: Wed 30 Apr 2014, 02:33    Post subject: DebianDog Wheezy live-boot-2x  

DebianDog Wheezy live-boot-2x:

Never use the same /live folder name for more DebianDog frugall install on different partitions. Use different folder name for more DebianDog frugal install. You will find information and example boot code at the end of this post.

Boot with initrd1.img created with initramfs-tools-v2.x.
Debian Wheezy Live CD using live-boot version 2.x or Debian-Squeeze boot and save file options.
The difference is initrd1.img is made with initramfs-tools-2x which gives back Copy On Write (COW) option.
EDIT: Since October 2014 all boot methods have /live/cow (Copy On Write) and all related to this scripts work with every boot method.

==========================================
Debian save file is nothing different from Puppy linux pupsave.2fs save file. Just the name is different. You can create empty pupsave.2fs save file from Puppy linux and rename it to live-rw. Now you can use it with DebianDog.
==========================================

The easiest way to test DebianDog live-rw save file:
Download this archive with 1Gb example live-rw save file. Extract it on top of any ext or vfat partition including the boot partition.
http://smokey01.com/saintless/1gb-example-save-file.zip

Add persistent in kernel boot line. Example boot code after extracting /live folder on top of sda1.

Code:
title DebianDog (sda1)
root=(hd0,0)
kernel /live/vmlinuz1 boot=live config persistent swapon quickreboot noprompt autologin showmounts
initrd /live/initrd1.img


Now DebianDog will use this live-rw save file on boot just like Puppy uses pupsave.2sfs save file.
If you remove persistent from the boot code no save file will be used.

The same way instead live-rw save file you can use ext partition labeled live-rw.

Read more about live-boot-2x code options here:
http://live-systems.org/manpages/oldstable/en/html/live-boot.7.html
You will find there options to use different save file name and location as many other options.

Live-snapshot save in cpio archive option available only for live-boot-2x. More information here:
http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=783787#783787

Workaround from William how to use live-rw save file on NTFS partition:
http://ns1.murga-projects.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=758027&sid=e6d575d4e2a5f4371ba064c5e210e400#758027


How to use Make Save File utility from DebianDog with pictures:
http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=773215#773215

========================================

More information from William:
Quote:
How to boot DebianDog-Wheezy live-boot-2x from directory other than /live

The trick here is simply to provide the correct paths to vmlinuz1 and initrd1.img and to use kernel line parameter "live-media-path" to point to where 01-filesystem.squashfs is stored (or to storage location of whatever your squashed filesystem is named).

For example,

If you extracted the whole live folder INCLUDING the containing directory called 'live' from DebianDog-Wheezy iso and put it in /debiandog_jwm on say /dev/sda1 (i.e. first partition of device sda) the following menu.lst stanza could be used:

Code:
title debiandog_jwm (on first partition of drive /dev/sda = hd0,0)
root=(hd0,0)
kernel /debiandog_jwm/live/vmlinuz1 boot=live config persistent swapon quickreboot noprompt autologin showmounts live-media-path=debiandog_jwm/live/
initrd /debiandog_jwm/live/initrd1.img



If alternatively you extract the CONTENTS ONLY OF DebianDog-Wheezy iso's 'live' directory into /debiandog_jwm on partition /dev/sdb2 (i.e. the second partition of device sdb), the following menu.lst stanza could be used:

Code:
title debiandog_jwm (on second partition of device /dev/sdb = hd1,1)
root=(hd1,1)
kernel /debiandog_jwm/vmlinuz1 boot=live config persistent swapon quickreboot noprompt autologin showmounts live-media-path=debiandog_jwm/
initrd /debiandog_jwm/initrd1.img

Note if /live is missing from the boot code you can not use porteus-boot method since it will search for /live folder and will exit with error if it can not find it.

_________________
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Last edited by saintless on Tue 14 Oct 2014, 08:43; edited 12 times in total
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saintless


Joined: 11 Jun 2011
Posts: 3014
Location: Bulgaria

PostPosted: Wed 30 Apr 2014, 02:34    Post subject: Debian-PorteusDog Wheezy (porteus-boot and save method)  

Debian-PorteusDog Wheezy (porteus-boot):

You can use encrypted save file created with Make Save File:
http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=773215#773215

Never use the same /live folder name for more DebianDog frugall install on different partitions. Use different folder name for more DebianDog frugal install. You will find information and example boot code at the end of this post.

Porteus initrd1.xz made for debian kernel and firmware.
Debian Wheezy Live CD using porteus boot method (very similar to Puppy linux boot and save options).

The initrd1.xz file is edited from Fred for use only with DebianDog.
It is not the exact Porteus boot method since it uses .squashfs modules extension instead .xzm and /live instead /debian folder, but the save file options are the same as in Porteus.
You can skip from=/ in the kernel boot line but it is better to keep it this way. For example if want to place folder /live inside folder /deb you need to use from=/deb/
copy2ram parameter will copy all available modules inside /live and its subfolders in RAM.

Boot code examples after extracting /live folder from the iso on top of sda1:

Copy to RAM without saving changes:
Code:
title Debian-PorteusDog Wheezy (sda1)
root (hd0,0)
kernel (hd0,0)/live/vmlinuz1 noauto from=/ copy2ram
initrd (hd0,0)/live/initrd1.xz


This will create automatically /live/changes folder for changes:
Code:
title Debian-PorteusDog Wheezy (sda1)
root (hd0,0)
kernel (hd0,0)/live/vmlinuz1 noauto from=/ changes=/live/
initrd (hd0,0)/live/initrd1.xz


This need to be created "changes.dat" (or whatever custom name) savefile first for saving changes:
Code:
title PorteusDog (sda1)
root (hd0,0)
kernel (hd0,0)/live/vmlinuz1 noauto from=/ changes=/live/changes.dat
initrd (hd0,0)/live/initrd1.xz


This way of saving changes is equivalent of "pupmode=13" in puppy , saving changes only at shutdown:
Code:
title PorteusDog (sda1)
root (hd0,0)
kernel (hd0,0)/live/vmlinuz1 noauto from=/ changes=EXIT:/live/changes.dat
initrd (hd0,0)/live/initrd1.xz

Note for last example: there will be prompt for save or not to save. Also for prompt to create savefile first time boot.

Like the previous one saving changes only at shutdown but in folder changes:
Code:
title PorteusDog (sda1)
root (hd0,0)
kernel (hd0,0)/live/vmlinuz1 noauto from=/ changes=EXIT:/live/
initrd (hd0,0)/live/initrd1.xz


For the last two boot codes only "changes=EXIT:/path-to-save-file/folder" you can type from terminal:
Code:
save2flash

This will save in the middle of a session.

==================================

Porteus initrd1.xz file depends now on /live folder. It will search for folder with name live and if it is not found an error message will appear. But you can place /live in any folder with different name and to use this code (inside folder /debiandog_jwm for example):

Code:
title PorteusDog (sda1)
root (hd0,0)
kernel (hd0,0)/debiandog_jwm/live/vmlinuz1 noauto from=/debiandog_jwm/
initrd (hd0,0)/debiandog_jwm/live/initrd1.xz


=======================================

_________________
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Last edited by saintless on Fri 31 Oct 2014, 07:35; edited 14 times in total
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saintless


Joined: 11 Jun 2011
Posts: 3014
Location: Bulgaria

PostPosted: Wed 30 Apr 2014, 02:34    Post subject: DebianDog Wheezy live-boot-3x  

DebianDog Wheezy live-boot-3x:

Never use the same /live folder name for more DebianDog frugall install on different partitions. Use different folder name for more DebianDog frugal install. You will find information and example boot code at the end of this post.

If you are not familiar with Debian live-boot-v3 (Debian Wheezy Live CD) do not use this method. It seems more complicated that the other 2 methods but it also has advantages like persistence for only one or more folders instead full persistence.

Boot with initrd.img created with initramfs-tools-v3.x.
Debian Wheezy Live CD using live-boot version 3.x or Debian Wheezy boot method.

To save changes you need to create save file named persistence or ext partition with label persistence + adding persistence.conf file inside this save file or save partition (both save file and partition can be encrypted).

The easiest way to test this save file option is to download this archive with 1Gb save file example with persistence.conf file for full persistence included. Just extract it on top of a partition, but not on the boot partition:
http://smokey01.com/saintless/1Gb-persistence-or-live-rw.zip

You need to add persistence in kernel boot line otherwise no save file will be used. Example boot code after extracting /live folder from the iso on top of sda1.
Code:
title DebianDog Wheezy live-boot-3x (sda1)
root=(hd0,0)
kernel /live/vmlinuz1 boot=live config persistence swapon rw-basemount quickreboot noeject autologin
initrd /live/initrd.img


Read more about live-boot-3x code options here:
http://live-systems.org/manpages/stable/en/html/live-boot.7.html

Thanks to dzz from Refracta forum and his initrd patch we can use encrypted save file or partition even on the same partition where /live folder is located (boot partition). The patch triggers boot code parameter rw-basemount. The standard boot script live is replaced with a patched one from /opt/bin/special/patch-live-initrd/files/scripts (included in DebianDog-Jwm version iso). In case you need it for patching initrd for new installed kernel here is download link:
http://www.smokey01.com/saintless/Fredx181/patch-live-initrd-from-refracta.tar.gz
The patch also fixes the swapon (or swap) boot parameter for live-boot-3x. Now auto swapon on boot works.

Example boot code for (sda1) using encrypted save file inside /live folder:
Code:
title DebianDog Wheezy live-boot-3 Persistence Encrypted
rootnoverify (hd0,0)
kernel /live/vmlinuz1 boot=live config swapon noeject quickreboot autologin rw-basemount persistence persistence-path=/live/ persistence-encryption=none,luks
initrd /live/initrd.img

rw-basemount (or basemountmode=rw,noatime) mounts the boot partition read and write. Otherwise it will be read-only mounted.
persistence-path=/live/ - gives the path where persistence save file is located (/live/persistence in this example)
persistence-encryption=none,luks - the system will search fo Luks encrypted or no-encrypted save file or save partition or save file located inside encrypted partition.

Creating save file from command line:
Code:
dd if=/dev/null of=persistence bs=1M seek=2000 # for 2GB save file
mkfs.ext2 -F persistence


Also you need to create persistence.conf file with this content for full peristence. Note file persistence.conf needs to end with a new empty line or persistence won't work (thanks for the tip, Step):
Code:
/ union


Then copy the persistence.conf file inside persistence save file:
Code:
mkdir /mntpt
mount -o loop /path-to/persistence /mntpt
cp /path-to/persistence.conf /mntpt
umount /mntpt
rmdir /mntpt


How to use Make Save File utility from DebianDog with pictures (but you still need to copy from command line persistence.conf file inside after):
http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=773215#773215

More information about the content options in persistence.conf file here:
http://live-systems.org/manpages/stable/en/html/persistence.conf.5.html

You can setup more than one live-boot-3x DebianDog frugal install in different folder names the same way as in live-boot-2x

/etc/fstab - if you like to edit this file manually adding mount points remove swapon option from boot code. Otherwise it will create new empty /etc/fstab on boot or only with swap partition line (if swap partition is found). You can still swapon partition on boot by creating symlink /opt/bin/mount-swap in /root/Startup:
Code:
ln -sf /opt/bin/mount-swap /root/Startup

More information about this you can read here and here.

Edit: Since October 2014 there is included script /opt/bin/cowsave from Fred and /live/cow (+ /live/image) links are ato-created on boot. RemasterCow now works with every boot method and any save file/partition or no-save option.


=======================================

_________________
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Last edited by saintless on Sun 01 Mar 2015, 05:00; edited 23 times in total
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saintless


Joined: 11 Jun 2011
Posts: 3014
Location: Bulgaria

PostPosted: Wed 30 Apr 2014, 02:34    Post subject: Saving changes without save file on first boot  

Saving changes without save file on first boot:

Lets say you like to test DebianDog from CD. Your computer has enough RAM (1Gb and more), you have ext partition on your HDD and you decide to install some programs with apt-get to test if all works OK.

You will reproduce all your actions easy again and again later but even without save file you have a choice to save the changes in separate module with RemasterCow. More information here:
http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=773214#773214

For DebianDog Jwm/icewm version run System->RemasterCow
(for openbox/xfce version run Create Module From Changes).
Then chose the partition and name for working folder (02-my-changes for example) and module 02-my-changes-squashfs (for example).
This will save your changes in separate sfs module.



Then you can load this new module with Utilities -> SFS-Loader or by right click sfs-load option. Or just to make frugal install and place the module inside /live folder. It will be loaded on every boot.

=========================================

Last edited by saintless on Tue 14 Oct 2014, 08:52; edited 11 times in total
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saintless


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Posts: 3014
Location: Bulgaria

PostPosted: Wed 30 Apr 2014, 02:35    Post subject: Boot DebianDog with different kernel  

Booting with different kernel (only in case DebianDog has boot problems on your hardware):

Edit: In case you need RTAI kernel for LinuxCNC or similar software read here.

Important information: Do not use Copy to RAM for the first test with separate kernel module. live-boot-2x and live-boot-3x boot codes are setup to copy only one sfs module in Ram. If you prefer to use Copy to Ram with separate kernel module change toram=01-filesystem.squashfs to toram only in the boot codes in menu.lst or use porteus-boot (which is setup to copy all modules in RAM).

Download one of the following archives and extract it in /live folder. Change menu.lst to point new initrd and vmlinuz files. There is Readme-initrd.txt in every archive with information for what boot method is every initrd file:

026-kernel-3.14-Pae.tar.gz - Debian kernel-3.14-0.bpo.1-686-Pae - for modern multi-core machines (and any PC with PAE capability). It has initrd files for live-boot-2.x, live-boot-3.x and porteus-boot.
http://smokey01.com/saintless/DebianDog/System-modules/026-kernel-3.14-Pae.tar.gz

Use this in your grub boot menu list:
vmlinuz6
initrd61.img - for live-boot-3x save file method. + encrypted save
initrd62.img - for live-boot-2x save file method.
initrd63.xz - for porteus-boot and save file method. + encrypted save

Check the new kernel after boot:
Code:
root@debian:~# uname -r
3.14-0.bpo.1-686-pae
root@debian:~# uname -a
Linux debian 3.14-0.bpo.1-686-pae #1 SMP Debian 3.14.4-1~bpo70+1


/opt/bin/update-dpkg-314pae - single click on this script will update dpkg database with information for the new kernel. Needed only in case you decide to remaster the system.

=============================================

022-kernel-686-pae.zip - Debian kernel-3.2.0-4-686-Pae - for modern multi-core machines (and any PC with PAE capability). It has initrd files for live-boot-2.x, live-boot-3.x and porteus-boot.
http://smokey01.com/saintless/DebianDog/System-modules/022-kernel-686-pae.zip

Use this in your grub boot menu list:
vmlinuz2
initrd21.img - for live-boot-3x save file method. + encrypted save
initrd22.img - for live-boot-2x save file method.
initrd23.xz - for porteus-boot and save file method. + encrypted save

Check the new kernel after boot:
Code:
root@debian:~# uname -r
3.2.0-4-686-pae
root@debian:~# uname -a
Linux debian 3.2.0-4-686-pae #1 SMP Debian 3.2.51-1 i686 GNU/Linux


/opt/bin/update-dpkg-686-pae - single click on this script will update dpkg database with information for the new kernel. Needed only in case you decide to remaster the system.

==========================================

023-kernel-3.9.11-porteus.zip - Porteus kernel-3.9.11 (the smallest one). It has only porteus-boot (Debian-PorteusDog) initrd file.
http://smokey01.com/saintless/DebianDog/System-modules/023-kernel-3.9.11-porteus.zip

Use this in your grub boot menu list:
vmlinuz3
initrd3.xz - porteus-boot only available for this kernel. - (No encrypted save option. Something is missing in kernel compiling encrypted support. Change in initrd3.xz is not enough.)


Check the new kernel after boot:
Code:
root@debian:~# uname -r
3.9.11-porteus
root@debian:~# uname -a
Linux debian 3.9.11-porteus #1 SMP PREEMPT Mon Jul 22 23:09:06 UTC 2013 i686 GNU/Linux


/opt/bin/update-dpkg-porteus - single click on this script will update dpkg database with information for the new kernel. Needed only in case you decide to remaster the system.

==========================================

024-kernel-3.12.0.bpo.1.zip - Debian kernel-3.12.0.bpo.1. It has live-boot-v2.x, live-boot-v.3.x and porteus-boot initrd files included.
http://smokey01.com/saintless/DebianDog/System-modules/024-kernel-3.12.0.bpo.1.zip

Use this in your grub boot menu list:
vmlinuz4
initrd3.img - for live-boot-3x save file method. + encrypted save
initrd4.img - for live-boot-2x save file method.
initrd4.xz - for porteus-boot and save file method. + encrypted save

Check the new kernel after boot:
Code:
root@debian:~# uname -r
3.12-0.bpo.1-486
root@debian:~# uname -a
Linux debian 3.12-0.bpo.1-486 #1 Debian 3.12.9-1~bpo70+1 (2014-02-07) i686 GNU/Linux


/opt/bin/update-dpkg-kernel-312 - single click on this script will update dpkg database with information for the new kernel. Needed only in case you decide to remaster the system.

=======================================

025-kernel-3.13.6-porteus.zip - Porteus kernel-3.13.6. It has only porteus-boot (Debian-PorteusDog) initrd file:
http://www.smokey01.com/saintless/DebianDog/System-modules/025-kernel-3.13.6-porteus.zip

Use this in your grub boot menu list:
vmlinuz5
initrd5.xz - porteus-boot only available for this kernel. - added encrypted save option.

========================================

You can easy remaster DebianDog with new kernel. Every kernel module has dpkg-update script in /opt/bin Single click on the script will update dpkg database with information.
Then remove the previous kernel with:
Code:
apt-get purge linux-image-3.2.0-4-486

And remaster the system with RemasterDog. How to use RemasterDog read here:
http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=773212#773212

Example instruction for remastering with specific new kernel module here:
http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=779972#779972

=========================================

If you already changed the default kernel and made few more remasters of DebianDog you can reverse the default 3.2.0-4-486 kernel any time very easy the same way by downloading this module and following the same procedure:
http://smokey01.com/saintless/DebianDog/System-modules/021-kernel-486.zip

Use this in your grub boot menu list:
vmlinuz1
initrd.img - for live-boot-3x save file method. + encrypted save
initrd1.img - for live-boot-2x save file method.
initrd1.xz - for porteus-boot and save file method. + encrypted save

/opt/bin/update-dpkg-486 - single click on this script will update dpkg database with information for the new kernel. Needed only in case you decide to remaster the system.

======================================

It is easy to install any new kernel from Debian repository with apt-get. The only difficult part is to create new initrd.img for every boot method. I will give some information about this in the next post.

========================================

Last edited by saintless on Fri 09 Jan 2015, 17:01; edited 17 times in total
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saintless


Joined: 11 Jun 2011
Posts: 3014
Location: Bulgaria

PostPosted: Wed 30 Apr 2014, 02:35    Post subject: Installing new kernel and creating new initrd files  

Please, do not use this instruction till this message is removed. It needs some changes after replacing initrd.img with patched version and adding cowsave script for all boot methods.


How to install new kernel with apt-get and create new initrd files:

Edit: 04.06.2014: Complete changed instruction that makes the process almost fully automated. + creating initrd files for all boot methods.

Important notes before installing new kernel with apt-get:

1. Boot with live-boot-3x (official Debian Wheezy initrd.img). Check the post for live-boot-3x on this page above.
2. Boot with fresh (empty) save file or boot without persistence.
3. Make sure all three (nitrd.img, initrd1.img, initrd1.xz) from DebianDog iso are inside /live boot folder.
4. Make sure you have ext formated partition for working folder.
5. If you have less than 1Gb Ram use persistence save file.
6. Works for 32bit i486 and i686 pae or non pae architecture. Not tested with 64bit.

If you are ready to start boot with live-boot-3x (initrd.img).
Open terminal window and type: new-kernel to start the process.
Read carefull the instructions from terminal and xdialog windows.
In short the scripts will install new kernel, create separate kernel module from it, create new initrd files for each boot method and move them in /live boot folder.
Choose careful the first step about persistence or no-persistence.

Step by step preview instruction:
Open terminal and type new-kernel

Confirm with OK and be careful to check if you have enough swap space or Ram and persistence or no-persistence boot.

In the example I choose persistence save file option 2.
Next step is adding backports repository in /etc/apt/sources.list You will not see any message if the repo is not there. If it exists you will see this message:

Click OK to continue and confirm backing up /live/image/live/initrd.img:

Click Ok to confirm apt-get update:

Now confirm searching all available kernels:

Code:
alsa-base - ALSA driver configuration files
linux-headers-3.2.0-4-486 - Header files for Linux 3.2.0-4-486
linux-headers-3.2.0-4-686-pae - Header files for Linux 3.2.0-4-686-pae
linux-headers-3.2.0-4-amd64 - Header files for Linux 3.2.0-4-amd64
linux-headers-3.2.0-4-rt-686-pae - Header files for Linux 3.2.0-4-rt-686-pae
linux-image-3.2.0-4-486 - Linux 3.2 for older PCs
linux-image-3.2.0-4-686-pae - Linux 3.2 for modern PCs
linux-image-3.2.0-4-686-pae-dbg - Debugging symbols for Linux 3.2.0-4-686-pae
linux-image-3.2.0-4-amd64 - Linux 3.2 for 64-bit PCs
linux-image-3.2.0-4-rt-686-pae - Linux 3.2 for modern PCs, PREEMPT_RT
linux-image-3.2.0-4-rt-686-pae-dbg - Debugging symbols for Linux 3.2.0-4-rt-686-pae
linux-image-2.6-486 - Linux for older PCs (dummy package)
linux-image-2.6-686 - Linux for modern PCs (dummy package)
linux-image-2.6-686-bigmem - Linux for PCs with 4GB+ RAM (dummy package)
linux-image-2.6-686-pae - Linux for modern PCs (dummy package)
linux-image-2.6-amd64 - Linux for 64-bit PCs (dummy package)
linux-image-486 - Linux for older PCs (meta-package)
linux-image-686 - Linux for modern PCs (dummy package)
linux-image-686-bigmem - Linux for PCs with 4GB+ RAM (dummy package)
linux-image-686-pae - Linux for modern PCs (meta-package)
linux-image-amd64 - Linux for 64-bit PCs (meta-package)
linux-image-rt-686-pae - Linux for modern PCs (meta-package), PREEMPT_RT
nvidia-kernel-3.2.0-4-486 - NVIDIA binary kernel module for Linux 3.2.0-4-486
nvidia-kernel-3.2.0-4-686-pae - NVIDIA binary kernel module for Linux 3.2.0-4-686-pae
nvidia-kernel-3.2.0-4-amd64 - NVIDIA binary kernel module for Linux 3.2.0-4-amd64
linux-headers-3.12-0.bpo.1-486 - Header files for Linux 3.12-0.bpo.1-486
linux-headers-3.12-0.bpo.1-686-pae - Header files for Linux 3.12-0.bpo.1-686-pae
linux-headers-3.12-0.bpo.1-amd64 - Header files for Linux 3.12-0.bpo.1-amd64
linux-headers-3.12-0.bpo.1-rt-686-pae - Header files for Linux 3.12-0.bpo.1-rt-686-pae
linux-headers-3.13-0.bpo.1-486 - Header files for Linux 3.13-0.bpo.1-486
linux-headers-3.13-0.bpo.1-686-pae - Header files for Linux 3.13-0.bpo.1-686-pae
linux-headers-3.13-0.bpo.1-amd64 - Header files for Linux 3.13-0.bpo.1-amd64
linux-headers-3.14-0.bpo.1-486 - Header files for Linux 3.14-0.bpo.1-486
linux-headers-3.14-0.bpo.1-686-pae - Header files for Linux 3.14-0.bpo.1-686-pae
linux-headers-3.14-0.bpo.1-amd64 - Header files for Linux 3.14-0.bpo.1-amd64
linux-headers-3.14-0.bpo.1-rt-686-pae - Header files for Linux 3.14-0.bpo.1-rt-686-pae
linux-image-3.12-0.bpo.1-486 - Linux 3.12 for older PCs
linux-image-3.12-0.bpo.1-686-pae - Linux 3.12 for modern PCs
linux-image-3.12-0.bpo.1-686-pae-dbg - Debugging symbols for Linux 3.12-0.bpo.1-686-pae
linux-image-3.12-0.bpo.1-amd64 - Linux 3.12 for 64-bit PCs
linux-image-3.12-0.bpo.1-rt-686-pae - Linux 3.12 for modern PCs, PREEMPT_RT
linux-image-3.12-0.bpo.1-rt-686-pae-dbg - Debugging symbols for Linux 3.12-0.bpo.1-rt-686-pae
linux-image-3.13-0.bpo.1-486 - Linux 3.13 for older PCs
linux-image-3.13-0.bpo.1-686-pae - Linux 3.13 for modern PCs
linux-image-3.13-0.bpo.1-686-pae-dbg - Debugging symbols for Linux 3.13-0.bpo.1-686-pae
linux-image-3.13-0.bpo.1-amd64 - Linux 3.13 for 64-bit PCs
linux-image-3.14-0.bpo.1-486 - Linux 3.14 for older PCs
linux-image-3.14-0.bpo.1-686-pae - Linux 3.14 for modern PCs
linux-image-3.14-0.bpo.1-686-pae-dbg - Debugging symbols for Linux 3.14-0.bpo.1-686-pae
linux-image-3.14-0.bpo.1-amd64 - Linux 3.14 for 64-bit PCs
linux-image-3.14-0.bpo.1-rt-686-pae - Linux 3.14 for modern PCs, PREEMPT_RT
linux-image-3.14-0.bpo.1-rt-686-pae-dbg - Debugging symbols for Linux 3.14-0.bpo.1-rt-686-pae
linux-image-686-pae-dbg - Debugging symbols for Linux 686-pae configuration (meta-package)
linux-image-rt-686-pae-dbg - Debugging symbols for Linux rt-686-pae configuration (meta-package)

Then you will see this window with instruction. Be careful not to close it yet:

Open new terminal window and type apt-get install name-of kernel (in our example it is linux-image-3.13-0.bpo.1-686-pae):

You can select the kernel and paste it with scroll mouse button in the second terminal window or just type it.
Code:
root@debian:~# apt-get install linux-image-3.13-0.bpo.1-686-pae
Reading package lists... Done
Building dependency tree       
Reading state information... Done
Suggested packages:
  linux-doc-3.13 debian-kernel-handbook grub-pc extlinux lilo
Recommended packages:
  libc6-i686
The following NEW packages will be installed:
  linux-image-3.13-0.bpo.1-686-pae
0 upgraded, 1 newly installed, 0 to remove and 31 not upgraded.
Need to get 29.9 MB of archives.
After this operation, 110 MB of additional disk space will be used.
Get:1 http://ftp.de.debian.org/debian/ wheezy-backports/main linux-image-3.13-0.bpo.1-686-pae i386 3.13.10-1~bpo70+1 [29.9 MB]
Fetched 29.9 MB in 59s (506 kB/s)                                             
Preconfiguring packages ...
Selecting previously unselected package linux-image-3.13-0.bpo.1-686-pae.
(Reading database ... 28132 files and directories currently installed.)
Unpacking linux-image-3.13-0.bpo.1-686-pae (from .../linux-image-3.13-0.bpo.1-686-pae_3.13.10-1~bpo70+1_i386.deb) ...
Setting up linux-image-3.13-0.bpo.1-686-pae (3.13.10-1~bpo70+1) ...
/etc/kernel/postinst.d/initramfs-tools:
update-initramfs: Generating /boot/initrd.img-3.13-0.bpo.1-686-pae
W: Possible missing firmware /lib/firmware/e100/d102e_ucode.bin for module e100
W: Possible missing firmware /lib/firmware/e100/d101s_ucode.bin for module e100
W: Possible missing firmware /lib/firmware/e100/d101m_ucode.bin for module e100
live-boot: core filesystems devices utils udev wget blockdev ftpfs.
root@debian:~#

The warnings are for missing firmware that is available for install from non-free repository. If you see no errors as it is in the example here go back to the last xdialog window and close it:

Next window is back up in case you closed the previous one before opening new terminal to install the kernel. Just click OK to continue:

Remaster-Kernel will auto-start. Choose ext partition for working folder and name for working folder and squashfs kernel module:

It will create new kernel module without confirmation and will move it inside /live/image/live (/live boot folder):


Choose to delete or not the working folder at the end:

Confirm next window to start make-initrd-files script:

Chose base initrd.img for your new installed kernel from /boot folder:

It will extract this new base initrd.img and initrd1.img and initrd1.xz from the default DebianDog kernel and replace /lib/modules folders and repack them again. All is automated without confirmation.
All new initrd files will be moved in /live boot folder.

Close the last information window to finish the process:

Your new kernel module is inside /live/image/live with vmlinuz and all new initrd files.
Change your boot code to point:
vmlinuz
new-initrd.img - live-boot-3x
new-initrd1.img - live-boot-2x
new-initrd1.xz - porteus-boot

=============================================
New-kernel scripts are available inside /opt/bin in both versions or from this archive:
http://smokey01.com/saintless/Fredx181/new-kernel-scripts.tar.gz
The archive includes:
make-new-initrd - creates new initrd files for live-boot2x and porteus-boot
remaster-kernel - moded version of RemasterCow script special for kernel modules.
new-kernel - the script that calls all other scripts and more.
And needed only for erlier versions of DebianDog:
mount-swap (not needed for DebianDog uploaded 0ctober 2014) - mount SWAP partition script.

=============================================

Last edited by saintless on Mon 02 Feb 2015, 04:31; edited 43 times in total
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saintless


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Posts: 3014
Location: Bulgaria

PostPosted: Wed 30 Apr 2014, 02:36    Post subject: Making separate module with option to update dpkg database  

Making separate module with option to update dpkg database safe:

This information is taken mostly from JBV included in FoxyRoxyLinux. The method is much more polished there and does also auto-update on the fly adding the script content in /etc/rc.local
What I give here is very basic information what changes are needed for this to work proper. For anyone interested here is more information about dpkg database from the source:
http://foxyroxylinux.com/viewtopic.php?f=20&t=201&sid=b94fef2b8bb4ed384b690cb464f97ab1

Lets just take the above example installing
Code:
apt-get install linux-image-3.2.0-4-686-pae

After the installation finish use RemasterCow to make new module with 3.2.0-4-686-pae kernel but do not accept to make new module. Much more work has to be done in the working folder. RemasterCow will do most of the cleaning and it will be safe to use the module as it is without further cleaning by only making dpkg update database script.
Now look inside the working folder (for example /live/image/02-k3.2.0-4-686-pae).
What you can clean more safe from here is:
/boot folder - you do not need it inside the module. What you need from there is initrd.img and vmlinuz to be placed in /live folder for boot with the new kernel.
The rest of the cleaning is different for every program so the safe choice is not to remove something if you are not sure what it does.
Be sure to delete /etc/network/interfaces since it includes custom network settings. This is done automatically with the new RemasterCow script.

Making update dpkg database safe script:
New RemasterCow script has as default option not to register dpkg by adding -new at the end of /var/lib/dpkg/info, status and available. Rename them back if needed.
Now look inside the working dir in /live/image/02-k3.2.0-4-686-pae/var/lib/dpkg/info
You will see there preinstall, postinstall scripts and tamplates, list and md5sum files for kernel 3.2.0-4-686-pae. Leave them as they are.
Now create inside /live/image/02-k/var/lib/dpkg empty files named status.686-pae and available.686-pae.
Open /live/image/02-k3.2.0-4-686-pae/var/lib/dpkg/status and find the information about kernel 3.2.0-4-686-pae. Select it and copy inside status.686-pae file. It is important to add two empty lines at the end of status.686-pae and if you add more than one package to leave one empty line between the packages:
Code:
Package: linux-image-3.2.0-4-686-pae
Status: install ok installed
Priority: optional
Section: kernel
Installed-Size: 80175
Maintainer: Debian Kernel Team <debian-kernel@lists.debian.org>
Architecture: i386
Source: linux
Version: 3.2.51-1
Provides: linux-image, linux-modules-3.2.0-4-686-pae
Depends: kmod | module-init-tools, linux-base (>= 3~), initramfs-tools (>= 0.99~) | linux-initramfs-tool
Pre-Depends: debconf | debconf-2.0
Recommends: firmware-linux-free (>= 3~), libc6-i686
Suggests: linux-doc-3.2, debian-kernel-handbook, grub-pc | extlinux | lilo
Breaks: at (<< 3.1.12-1+squeeze1), initramfs-tools (<< 0.99~)
Description: Linux 3.2 for modern PCs
 The Linux kernel 3.2 and modules for use on PCs with one or more
 processors supporting PAE.
 .
 This kernel requires PAE (Physical Address Extension). This feature is
 supported by the Intel Pentium Pro/II/III/4/4M/D, Xeon, Core and Atom; AMD
 Geode NX, Athlon (K7), Duron, Opteron, Sempron, Turion or Phenom;
 Transmeta Efficeon; VIA C7; and some other processors.
 .
 This kernel also runs on a Xen hypervisor.  It supports both privileged
 (dom0) and unprivileged (domU) operation.



Now make the same by copy/paste the information from available to available.686-pae (note the information in available has one extra Size line from the information in status. You can not copy/paste from available to status and the opposite). Again it is important to add two empty lines at the end of status.686-pae and if you add more than one package to leave one empty line between the packages:
Code:
Package: linux-image-3.2.0-4-686-pae
Priority: optional
Section: kernel
Installed-Size: 80261
Maintainer: Debian Kernel Team <debian-kernel@lists.debian.org>
Architecture: i386
Source: linux
Version: 3.2.57-3
Provides: linux-image, linux-modules-3.2.0-4-686-pae
Depends: kmod | module-init-tools, linux-base (>= 3~), initramfs-tools (>= 0.99~) | linux-initramfs-tool
Pre-Depends: debconf | debconf-2.0
Recommends: firmware-linux-free (>= 3~), libc6-i686
Suggests: linux-doc-3.2, debian-kernel-handbook, grub-pc | extlinux | lilo
Breaks: at (<< 3.1.12-1+squeeze1), initramfs-tools (<< 0.99~)
Size: 22942260
Description: Linux 3.2 for modern PCs
 The Linux kernel 3.2 and modules for use on PCs with one or more
 processors supporting PAE.
 .
 This kernel requires PAE (Physical Address Extension). This feature is
 supported by the Intel Pentium Pro/II/III/4/4M/D, Xeon, Core and Atom; AMD
 Geode NX, Athlon (K7), Duron, Opteron, Sempron, Turion or Phenom;
 Transmeta Efficeon; VIA C7; and some other processors.
 .
 This kernel also runs on a Xen hypervisor.  It supports both privileged
 (dom0) and unprivileged (domU) operation.



Important note: You do not need to create available.686-pae file for this kernel with DebianDog since available file contains information for all installed and removed packages on the system in some point. DebianDog has information for 686-pae kernel included already in /var/lib/dpkg/available since it was one of the two kernels included in Debian Wheezy Live CD.

Now you can delete safe /var/lib/dpkg/available and /var/lib/dpkg/status files and create new executable script inside the working folder with name update-dpkg-686-pae fro example. The easy way is to copy some script from /opt/bin (audio-setup for example) to /image/live/02-k3.2.0-4-686-pae/opt/bin and to rename it to update-dpkg-686-pae.
Then replace the content with this:
Code:
#!/bin/bash

cd /var/lib/dpkg
cp -f status status-old
cat status.686-pae >> status
rm status.686-pae
cp -f available available-old
cat available.686-pae >> available
rm available.686-pae
cd /opt/bin
rm update-dpkg-686-pae

Make new module from the working folder. Now after loading the module you will have a choice to update dpkg database safe even if you already use a remastered later version of DebianDog with more programs included (in case you decide to remaster the system again with this module loaded) or to run this module as non dpkg registered,
Single click on the script will update dpkg information and delete the script.
Deleting at the end update-dpkg-686-pae, status.686-pae, available.686-pae is important action to prevent second run of this script after it is executed. This will add the information two times breaking dpkg database.

Some libs will add information in /var/lib/apt/extended_states and the information could be added the same way there but from what I can tell it will not break anything if you skip this action for extended_states.

===========================================

Last edited by saintless on Sun 04 May 2014, 12:30; edited 10 times in total
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saintless


Joined: 11 Jun 2011
Posts: 3014
Location: Bulgaria

PostPosted: Wed 30 Apr 2014, 02:42    Post subject: Using unsquashfs command on Low-RAM computer  

I use low RAM computers with 64 - 512 Mb RAM and I had strange problem with unsquashfs command.
This was the usual result I get:
Code:
root@debian:~# unsquashfs -d /live/image/2 /live/image/live/01-filesystem.squashfs
Parallel unsquashfs: Using 1 processor
38057 inodes (35160 blocks) to write

[======|                                                    ]  4237/35160  12%
Killed


At first I thought it has something to do with motherboard types or HDD types but it was nothing like this. The strange thing was I have this problem on a computer with 512 Mb RAM + 512 MB SWAP partition and I don't have it on a computer with 128 Mb RAM and 2 Gb SWAP partition. Actually it was memory issue.
Lets say you need to unsquash file with 300 Mb uncompressed data but you have 128 Mb RAM. It will never work unless you have big enough SWAP partition, because while the unsquashfs command is working and it writes on your hard drive, at the same time it uses cache buffer in RAM or SWAP partition with much bigger size than your RAM is. This is for example the memory report while unsquashfs command is working:
Code:
root@debian:~# free -m
             total       used       free     shared    buffers     cached
Mem:           247        243          3          0          4         24
-/+ buffers/cache:        215         31
Swap:         1021        264        757


To solve this problem you have two choices:
1. To create SWAP partition on your HDD and to add swapon option in your kernel grub line. This is not convenient because you will use part of your hard drive space as SWAP partition permanently.
2. To create and use SWAP file only when you need it and delete it when you don't need it. Here is the way to do this. In my example the SWAP file is 512 MB and it is placed in /live/image:
Code:
root@debian:~# dd if=/dev/zero of=/live/image/swapfile bs=1024 count=524288

Code:
root@debian:~# mkswap /live/image/swapfile 524288

You can use this swapfile right a way without reboot by typing:
Code:
root@debian:~# swapon /live/image/swapfile

This command will stop it and then you can delete it to save hard drive space:
Code:
root@debian:~# swapoff /live/image/swapfile


As Anikin pointed here for security reasons you can do also:
Code:
root@debian:~# chown root:root /live/image/swapfile
root@debian:~# chmod 0600 /live/image/swapfile

Otherwise the swap file could become world-readable.

==========================================

_________________
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Last edited by saintless on Fri 03 Apr 2015, 04:58; edited 1 time in total
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saintless


Joined: 11 Jun 2011
Posts: 3014
Location: Bulgaria

PostPosted: Wed 30 Apr 2014, 02:47    Post subject: Create and use SWAP file  

To create SWAP file type:
Code:
root@debian:~# dd if=/dev/zero of=/live/image/swapfile bs=1024 count=524288

Code:
root@debian:~# mkswap /live/image/swapfile 524288

In this example the SWAP file is 512 Mb and it is placed in /live/image.

You can start using this swapfile right a way without reboot with this command:
Code:
root@debian:~# swapon /live/image/swapfile

And you can stop it with this one:
Code:
root@debian:~# swapoff /live/image/swapfile


You can move this swap file on different partition and use it from there by changing the path, or you can delete it and recreate it again when you need it.

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saintless


Joined: 11 Jun 2011
Posts: 3014
Location: Bulgaria

PostPosted: Wed 30 Apr 2014, 02:51    Post subject: Create xorg.conf file  

Debian live does not use by default xorg.conf file. It probes your configuration every time when the system boots and it works fine most of the time.

Sometimes this auto-configuration may not be what you need.
For example I had a problem to change the colors from 16 Bit to 24 Bit.
The only way I've found is by editing the xorg.conf file. But we have to create one first.

To do this exit X (logout from the task bar button) and type:

Code:
Xorg -configure


This will create file /root/xorg.conf.new
Then enter X, rename xorg.conf.new to xorg.conf and move the file in /etc/x11
Then open xorg.conf with leafpad and edit what you need.

After reboot the system will be forced to read /etc/X11/xorg.conf

======================================

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saintless


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Posts: 3014
Location: Bulgaria

PostPosted: Wed 30 Apr 2014, 03:15    Post subject: Assign a Static IP address to eth0  

information from JBV. It works for DebianDog live-boot-v2, live-boot-v3 and porteus-boot:
Two ways for assigned a static IP address.
Both require a minor change in the kernel boot line code.

The option is "ip="

If you leave this option blank with no parameters, the system will use the contents of /etc/network/interfaces

Alternatively, you can specify the network parameters as follows ...
Code:
 ip=eth0:192.168.1.50:255.255.255.0:192.168.1.1
<where>
ip=[interface]:[IP_address]:[netmask]:[gateway]

Like this example:
Code:
title DebianDog live-boot-v2  (sda1)
root=(hd0,0)
kernel /live/vmlinuz1 boot=live config persistent ip=eth0:192.168.1.50:255.255.255.0:192.168.1.1 swapon quickreboot noprompt autologin showmounts
initrd /live/initrd1.img


To configure a static IP using /etc/network/interfaces
Code:
title DebianDog live-boot-v2  (sda1)
root=(hd0,0)
kernel /live/vmlinuz1 boot=live config persistent ip= swapon quickreboot noprompt autologin showmounts
initrd /live/initrd1.img


And in /etc/network/interfaces for example:
Code:
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

auto eth0
allow-hotplug eth0
iface eth0 inet static
  address 192.168.0.50
  gateway 192.168.0.1
  netmask 255.255.255.0
  network 192.168.0.0
  broadcast 192.168.0.255
  dns-nameservers 192.168.0.1


==========================================

And setting up wired network manually:
If you feel comfortable to setup wired settings from command line this is what I usually do (eth0 for example and my IP, Netmask, GW details. Replace them with yours.):

First step:
Code:
sudo ifup eth0

Setting up IP and Netmask:
Code:
sudo ifconfig eth0 192.168.1.2 netmask 255.255.255.0

Setting up default gateway:
Code:
sudo route add default gw 192.168.1.1 eth0

Add DNS servers in resolv.con (you can edit /etc/resolv.conf with any text editor):
Code:
sudo nano /etc/resolv.conf

For example my ISP DNS - replace them with yours:
Code:
nameserver 192.168.1.1
nameserver 198.41.0.4

Save the changes and you should have working connection.

Last edited by saintless on Sun 05 Oct 2014, 08:45; edited 6 times in total
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saintless


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Posts: 3014
Location: Bulgaria

PostPosted: Wed 30 Apr 2014, 03:31    Post subject: Important for persistent network settings  

Information from Emil which works as well for DebianDog Wheezy:
emil wrote:
Although nobody might use this oldstable squeeze live CD I share my experience to make wifi work with this version:

It is imperative to add the boot parameter nonetworking to the boot entry
Otherways the live config tools overwrite the /etc/network/interfaces et every fresh boot.

It seems it was (is?) an undocumented boot paramter - read here:
http://lists.debian.org/debian-live/2012/03/msg00031.html

my grub4dos entry now looks like

Code:
title Light-Debian-Core-Test
 root=(hd0,3)
 kernel /live/vmlinuz boot=live config persistent nonetworking swapon quickreboot noprompt autologin
 initrd /live/initrd.img
 boot


I have an old laptop and I needed to install the b43 low power drivers (with apt-get from non free repositories)
https://wiki.debian.org/bcm43xx

then I set up wifi drom the commandline
https://wiki.debian.org/WiFi/HowToUse#Command_Line

my /etc/network/interfaces looks like

Code:
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

allow-hotplug eth0
iface eth0 inet dhcp

auto wlan0
iface wlan0 inet dhcp
    wpa-ssid dummynetworkname
    wpa-psk dummypwd


now it works like charm!
maybe this can save some time, sometimes to someone.
cheers

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saintless


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Posts: 3014
Location: Bulgaria

PostPosted: Wed 30 Apr 2014, 03:34    Post subject:  

In case you choose to install and use Firehol firewall maybe you will see the following warnings:
Code:
root@debian:~# /etc/init.d/firehol start
[....] Starting Firewall: firehol

WARNING
File '/etc/firehol/RESERVED_IPS' is more than 90 days old.
You should update it to ensure proper operation of your firewall.

Run the supplied get-iana.sh script to generate this file.

 
 IMPORTANT WARNING:
 ------------------
 FireHOL cannot find your current kernel configuration.
 Please, either compile your kernel with /proc/config,
 or make sure there is a valid kernel config in:
 /usr/src/linux/.config
 
 Because of this, FireHOL will simply attempt to load
 all kernel modules for the services used, without
 being able to detect failures.
 
. ok


Even with the warnings Firehol works but you can fix them this way:

1. To fix File '/etc/firehol/RESERVED_IPS' is more than 90 days old. warning type this in terminal and press Enter:
Code:
touch -m /etc/firehol/RESERVED_IPS


2. If you see also this warning:
Code:
IMPORTANT WARNING:
 ------------------
 FireHOL cannot find your current kernel configuration.
 Please, either compile your kernel with /proc/config,
 or make sure there is a valid kernel config in:
 /usr/src/linux/.config
 
 Because of this, FireHOL will simply attempt to load
 all kernel modules for the services used, without
 being able to detect failures.
 
. ok


The fix is to add kernel configuration file in /boot directory.
It is included in 00-boot-folder-vmlinuz-initrd.squashfs here:
http://smokey01.com/saintless/DebianDog/System-modules/00-boot-folder-vmlinuz-initrd.squashfs

Or just extract the attached archive and copy config-3.2.0-4-486 inside /boot directory.

Then Firehol (if it is installed) will not give warnings anymore:
Code:
root@debian:~# /etc/init.d/firehol start
][....] Starting Firewall: firehol
root@debian:~#
boot.zip
Description 
zip

 Download 
Filename  boot.zip 
Filesize  33.4 KB 
Downloaded  205 Time(s) 

Last edited by saintless on Wed 14 May 2014, 11:33; edited 3 times in total
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fredx181

Joined: 11 Dec 2013
Posts: 1099
Location: holland

PostPosted: Wed 07 May 2014, 15:28    Post subject:  

Hi All,

Update: As written below to load 06-DEVX-DebDog-2.squashfs works but is not needed if you just install libdpkg-perl:
Code:
apt-get install libdpkg-perl


Update2:
Here's a better way IMO using apt-ftparchive instead of dpkg-scanpackages:
It doesn't need any extra installing or loading DEVX, just depends on apt-utils, which is already installed by default in DebianDog.
Let's take just for example you created directory '/media/sda1/myrepo'
Inside create folder e.g. 'deb-packages' so you get: /media/sda1/myrepo/deb-packages
Put all your .deb packages inside 'deb-packages'
Then run in terminal:
Code:

cd /media/sda1/myrepo
apt-ftparchive packages . > Packages
gzip -c Packages > Packages.gz
apt-ftparchive contents . > Contents
gzip -c Contents > Contents.gz
apt-ftparchive release . > Release

Add the local repo to /etc/apt/sources.list and update package lists:
Code:
echo "deb file:/media/sda1/myrepo/ ./" >> /etc/apt/sources.list
apt-get update


Here's how I made small test repo in google drive and dropbox (experimental):
http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=799928#799928

Also see 'Update' more below in red, something has changed the way it works
------------------------------------------------------

Here's little howto for creating a local repo.
For example from the .deb packages downloaded from here:
http://www.smokey01.com/saintless/Fredx181/

There's lots of info on the net but some of them suggests to use apache2 which we're not going to use here.
The script "dpkg-scanpackages" can create a local database from a folder with .deb files inside.
dpkg-scanpackages is part of "dpkg-dev" package but to install it, with all dependencies, it needs to much space for DebianDog.
So we need only "dpkg-scanpackages" and to load the DEVX

Attached: dpkg-scanpackages.zip

Extract and place the script "dpkg-scanpackages" somewhere in PATH e.g. /opt/bin

Download "06-DEVX-DebDog-2.squashfs" module, from here:

http://www.smokey01.com/saintless/DebianDog/System-modules
Then right-click on 06-DEVX-DebDog-2.squashfs and choose 'save link as'.

Then use SFS-loader to load it, or: from terminal opened in folder where you downloaded "06-DEVX-DebDog-2.squashfs":
Code:
loadmodule -a 06-DEVX-DebDog-2.squashfs


Let's take as example: a folder created on /media/sda1 named "myrepo":
(/media/sda1 must be a linux filesystem like ext3 or ext4)

Code:
mkdir /media/sda1/myrepo

Then copy all .deb files you want included in your local database to: /media/sda1/myrepo
Then in terminal:
Code:
cd  /media/sda1/myrepo
dpkg-scanpackages ./ /dev/null |gzip > Packages.gz

Then open /etc/apt/sources.list with geany:
Code:
geany /etc/apt/sources.list

And add to it on a single line:
Code:
deb file://media/sda1/myrepo/ ./

----------------------
Update: The above worked before, but not anymore, needs to be this:
Code:
deb file:/media/sda1/myrepo/ ./

(difference is one / instead of // after file:)
----------------------

Save the file.
Then update database:
Code:
apt-get update

Now you can install/uninstall all packages in /media/sda1/myrepo by using apt-get or synaptic.

When you remove or add .deb files in /media/sda1/myrepo you need to update the database again by loading the "06-DEVX-DebDog-2.squashfs" and doing the previous commands again:
[code]cd /media/sda1/myrepo
dpkg-scanpackages ./ /dev/null |gzip > Packages.gz

Fred
dpkg-scanpackages.zip
Description  Create local database
zip

 Download 
Filename  dpkg-scanpackages.zip 
Filesize  3.01 KB 
Downloaded  196 Time(s) 

Last edited by fredx181 on Mon 22 Sep 2014, 06:35; edited 4 times in total
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