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Puppy hidden backdoors in kernel?
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catpuppy

Joined: 05 Jan 2012
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Thu 05 Jan 2012, 13:07    Post subject:  Puppy hidden backdoors in kernel?  

Hello I wanted to know if there are any hidden backdoors in puppy?
I'm concerned about this because Windows has build in NSA backdoors
The famous NSA backdoor in all windows systems.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NSAKEY

They can see what you are doing!

Could the developer tell that puppy contains no backdoors?
I know linux is open source but it contains to much code to research for backdoors.

Puppy gets packages from pet but has it got build in package check md5?
So that someone couldn't change the package and hide coded backdoors?
thanks.
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Lobster
Official Crustacean


Joined: 04 May 2005
Posts: 15117
Location: Paradox Realm

PostPosted: Thu 05 Jan 2012, 23:49    Post subject:  


Quote:
They can see what you are doing!

'They' can barely keep tabs on their own spookiness . . .

No Linux kernel back doors are known of.
They have the same level of existence as the flying spaghetti monster Cool
Windows and to some extent BSD and Android collude with closed and spook sponsored systems.
Penguins are made of a different grade of fish.

If you like to scare yourself or others - try here for the latest FUD and let us know of any research you come up with . . . Smile
http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=398158#398158

I think cthisbear gives a realistic evaluation of the state of play in the next post . . .
(I used a 'backdoor' to edit this post)

Welcome to the kennels
Your Puppys are safe

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Last edited by Lobster on Fri 06 Jan 2012, 02:50; edited 1 time in total
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cthisbear

Joined: 29 Jan 2006
Posts: 3453
Location: Sydney Australia

PostPosted: Fri 06 Jan 2012, 00:56    Post subject:  

"I know linux is open source but it contains to much code to
research for backdoors "

Thou maketh a jest.....surely.

Come on mate....how much code in Windows???

In Office97 in Excel they had a little flying game built in.
You had to hit the keyboard in a sequence to get it running.

That gave you a view of the future.
Then Intel wanted their chips to identify you.

"""""""""

" Intel said last week that every new Pentium III would transmit a unique serial number internally and across the Internet to help identify computer users. "

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/e/a/1999/01/25/BUSINESS9338.dtl

"""""""""""

" Intel unveiled it's Pentium III chip which employees a Processor
Serial Number ( PSN ).
The encoded 96 bit number hard-wired chip traces any online communications to it's mother computer.

The dreaded COOKIES on many web sights are embedded into your
PC without your knowledge that can find out your password, name
and web sights you have visited.

Microsoft admitted that Windows 98 generates a fingerprint unique
to identify you known as GUID.
This GUID is generally hidden in Office 97 Word, Excel, and Power
Point programs.
What makes this most disturbing is every time you visit www.microsoft.com, this program scans your PC automatically
and gathers information without your knowledge.

It's not enough that Intel & Microsoft make billions in sales to it's customers, but even after they have dipped into your pocket they
now have the technology to dip into your privacy and your PC
without you even knowing it. "

http://www.theforbiddenknowledge.com/hardtruth/intel_microsoft_tracking.htm

""""""""""""

Easter eggs in Office 97

Microsoft Word 97 contained a hidden pinball game and
Microsoft Excel contained a hidden flight simulator. "

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Office_97

"""""""

" When programmers get bored out while developping a program,
they tend to amuse themselves by hiding games or scroling credits somewhere within their programs. These hidden sections of a program are commonly referred to as Easter eggs, and can be very fun for the programmer to hide, as well as for us to find. "

http://www.siliconguide.com/tips/win95/office/office.shtml

"""""""""

So welcome to Puppy but let's ease the bullshit button down.

Chris.

Last edited by cthisbear on Fri 06 Jan 2012, 21:20; edited 1 time in total
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sickgut


Joined: 23 Mar 2010
Posts: 1157
Location: Tasmania, Australia in the mountains.

PostPosted: Fri 06 Jan 2012, 08:32    Post subject:  

The simple4 fact is that its actually law on a federal level that every popular software and hardware communications device must have an easily accessible backdoor so that law enforcement can access this with the minimum of fuss.

This includes Windows itself, IE, firefox etc
i do not know if the linux kernel itself has this but every other software that is used for communicating has and this includes:

skype, msn, facebook etc etc etc

When something becomes popular and is widely used its illegal not to have a backdoor.

Even the TOR network lets law enforcement monitor your computer.
Dont rely on ssl encryption either. There exists a method for law enforcement to access your computer regardless of encryption, we are talking about backdoors in a way that is similar to open ports listening on your computer and law enforcement can connect to these. Not only is something like TOR compromised, it is beside the point, completely. This is because it doesnt matter what proxy you use, there is most likely a connection that allows direct access to and monitoring of your computer, they will know everything you do as all activity can be tracked on your computer itself at the isp or between you and the isp or they will monitor via a direct conenction to your computer. If you are connected to the internet at all, you can be sure that if they want to, law enforcement can monitor everything you do, whatever data ends up on your computer can be monitored, whatever you view on your screen can be seen.

There are also things in pop culture that the authorities encourage, like the lame idea that your webcam isnt active unless there is a light on next to it. Also all mobile phones microphones can be enabled without the user knowing, with the phone turned off. The only way to get around this is to take the batteries out.

Then there are the "leaks" that are actually publicized like apparently a entire list of MS backdoors was leaked a year ago or so. Notice a "LIST" there i not just one backdoor on your windows.

its kinda like ubuntu getting so big it cant include semi legal codecs in its OS, while less popular OSes can. When a hardware or software that is used for communication gets popular enough, there comes a time when it is required by law to facilitate an entry point for law enforcement. The company or individuals will be informed by whatever party that handles these things and they must work with whoever to incorporate the backdoor and ofcause be involved in a non disclosure agreement, the software or hardware producer cannot warn their customers.
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postfs1


Joined: 27 Mar 2010
Posts: 831

PostPosted: Fri 06 Jan 2012, 17:03    Post subject:  

sickgut wrote:
...


Puppy can show such a things on the piece of paper. If there are a windows in the building why not to see these elements of construction in non-dangerous representation... If the windows are everywhere then some personages destroy the chosen windows for making a doors.

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disciple

Joined: 20 May 2006
Posts: 6455
Location: Auckland, New Zealand

PostPosted: Fri 06 Jan 2012, 19:02    Post subject:  

sickgut wrote:
The simple4 fact is that its actually law on a federal level that every popular software and hardware communications device must have an easily accessible backdoor so that law enforcement can access this with the minimum of fuss.
...
Even the TOR network lets law enforcement monitor your computer.
...
There exists a method for law enforcement to access your computer regardless of encryption, we are talking about backdoors in a way that is similar to open ports listening on your computer and law enforcement can connect to these.

Please provide references.

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catpuppy

Joined: 05 Jan 2012
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Sat 07 Jan 2012, 08:08    Post subject:  

sickgut wrote:
The simple4 fact is that its actually law on a federal level that every popular software and hardware communications device must have an easily accessible backdoor so that law enforcement can access this with the minimum of fuss.

This includes Windows itself, IE, firefox etc
i do not know if the linux kernel itself has this but every other software that is used for communicating has and this includes:

skype, msn, facebook etc etc etc

When something becomes popular and is widely used its illegal not to have a backdoor.

Even the TOR network lets law enforcement monitor your computer.
Dont rely on ssl encryption either. There exists a method for law enforcement to access your computer regardless of encryption, we are talking about backdoors in a way that is similar to open ports listening on your computer and law enforcement can connect to these. Not only is something like TOR compromised, it is beside the point, completely. This is because it doesnt matter what proxy you use, there is most likely a connection that allows direct access to and monitoring of your computer, they will know everything you do as all activity can be tracked on your computer itself at the isp or between you and the isp or they will monitor via a direct conenction to your computer. If you are connected to the internet at all, you can be sure that if they want to, law enforcement can monitor everything you do, whatever data ends up on your computer can be monitored, whatever you view on your screen can be seen.

There are also things in pop culture that the authorities encourage, like the lame idea that your webcam isnt active unless there is a light on next to it. Also all mobile phones microphones can be enabled without the user knowing, with the phone turned off. The only way to get around this is to take the batteries out.

Then there are the "leaks" that are actually publicized like apparently a entire list of MS backdoors was leaked a year ago or so. Notice a "LIST" there i not just one backdoor on your windows.

its kinda like ubuntu getting so big it cant include semi legal codecs in its OS, while less popular OSes can. When a hardware or software that is used for communication gets popular enough, there comes a time when it is required by law to facilitate an entry point for law enforcement. The company or individuals will be informed by whatever party that handles these things and they must work with whoever to incorporate the backdoor and ofcause be involved in a non disclosure agreement, the software or hardware producer cannot warn their customers.


I see someone who know's what I'm trying to say, what you say is all true!

The government won't tell us!! see here...

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2010/09/government-seeks

If someone is using truecrypt don't use it! it contains backdoors like many other software, use only open source applications.

They want total control for there New world Order plans!!
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sickgut


Joined: 23 Mar 2010
Posts: 1157
Location: Tasmania, Australia in the mountains.

PostPosted: Sat 07 Jan 2012, 13:50    Post subject:  

disciple wrote:
sickgut wrote:
The simple4 fact is that its actually law on a federal level that every popular software and hardware communications device must have an easily accessible backdoor so that law enforcement can access this with the minimum of fuss.
...
Even the TOR network lets law enforcement monitor your computer.
...
There exists a method for law enforcement to access your computer regardless of encryption, we are talking about backdoors in a way that is similar to open ports listening on your computer and law enforcement can connect to these.

Please provide references.


about TOR?
goto their site, read the info. They actually tell you they must cooperate with law enforcement and also says that they are not allowed to tell users or post on their site by what means the network is being monitored and if and when monitoring is happening.

it doesnt matter what so call encryption or proxy you use at all, when your system is directly accessible, when this is happening, dont think that bouncing off of 40 servers to visit a site actually conceals the identity of your computer or stops law enforcement tracking you. This is backwards thinking if you trust this kind of thing, just because its not your IP going to a site doesnt mean you cant be tracked, this only makes it more difficult for people monitoring a specific site you vist to find your IP. This is the only protection and this is useless when law enforcement is involved as if you are under their watchful eye for some reason, its all done by accessing your system directly. Whatever keystrokes you type or sites you visit, whatever appears on your screen, everything you do on your computer while connected to the internet is easily monitored.

you can use 50 proxies if you like, makes no difference when they can actually view the contents of your browser on your system.
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nooby

Joined: 29 Jun 2008
Posts: 10557
Location: SwedenEurope

PostPosted: Sat 07 Jan 2012, 16:35    Post subject:  

No wonder that I am a pessimist.
Reality is even worse than my imagination
can come up with.

Hope it is okay if I do a friendly tease?????????

The David Icke thing about Reptoids and Lizzard
people that is delusions though? Such is not true? Smile

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disciple

Joined: 20 May 2006
Posts: 6455
Location: Auckland, New Zealand

PostPosted: Sat 07 Jan 2012, 17:58    Post subject:  

sickgut wrote:
disciple wrote:

Please provide references.


about TOR?
goto their site, read the info. They actually tell you they must cooperate with law enforcement and also says that they are not allowed to tell users or post on their site by what means the network is being monitored and if and when monitoring is happening.

Please tell us where on their site. All I can find is information like this (From the FAQ), which seems to indicate there is no such problem:
Quote:
I have a compelling reason to trace a Tor user. Can you help?

There is nothing the Tor developers can do to trace Tor users. The same protections that keep bad people from breaking Tor's anonymity also prevent us from figuring out what's going on.

Some fans have suggested that we redesign Tor to include a backdoor. There are two problems with this idea. First, it technically weakens the system too far. Having a central way to link users to their activities is a gaping hole for all sorts of attackers; and the policy mechanisms needed to ensure correct handling of this responsibility are enormous and unsolved. Second, the bad people aren't going to get caught by this anyway, since they will use other means to ensure their anonymity (identity theft, compromising computers and using them as bounce points, etc).

This ultimately means that it is the responsibility of site owners to protect themselves against compromise and security issues that can come from anywhere. This is just part of signing up for the benefits of the Internet. You must be prepared to secure yourself against the bad elements, wherever they may come from. Tracking and increased surveillance are not the answer to preventing abuse.

But remember that this doesn't mean that Tor is invulnerable. Traditional police techniques can still be very effective against Tor, such as investigating means, motive, and opportunity, interviewing suspects, writing style analysis, technical analysis of the content itself, sting operations, keyboard taps, and other physical investigations. The Tor Project is also happy to work with everyone including law enforcement groups to train them how to use the Tor software to safely conduct investigations or anonymized activities online.


Quote:
What are Entry Guards?

Tor (like all current practical low-latency anonymity designs) fails when the attacker can see both ends of the communications channel. For example, suppose the attacker controls or watches the Tor relay you choose to enter the network, and also controls or watches the website you visit. In this case, the research community knows no practical low-latency design that can reliably stop the attacker from correlating volume and timing information on the two sides.

So, what should we do? Suppose the attacker controls, or can observe, C relays. Suppose there are N relays total. If you select new entry and exit relays each time you use the network, the attacker will be able to correlate all traffic you send with probability (c/n)2. But profiling is, for most users, as bad as being traced all the time: they want to do something often without an attacker noticing, and the attacker noticing once is as bad as the attacker noticing more often. Thus, choosing many random entries and exits gives the user no chance of escaping profiling by this kind of attacker.

The solution is "entry guards": each Tor client selects a few relays at random to use as entry points, and uses only those relays for her first hop. If those relays are not controlled or observed, the attacker can't win, ever, and the user is secure. If those relays are observed or controlled by the attacker, the attacker sees a larger fraction of the user's traffic — but still the user is no more profiled than before. Thus, the user has some chance (on the order of (n-c)/n) of avoiding profiling, whereas she had none before.


Quote:
Is there a backdoor in Tor?

There is absolutely no backdoor in Tor. Nobody has asked us to put one in, and we know some smart lawyers who say that it's unlikely that anybody will try to make us add one in our jurisdiction (U.S.). If they do ask us, we will fight them, and (the lawyers say) probably win.

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catpuppy

Joined: 05 Jan 2012
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Sun 08 Jan 2012, 06:02    Post subject:  


Last edited by catpuppy on Sun 08 Jan 2012, 06:29; edited 2 times in total
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disciple

Joined: 20 May 2006
Posts: 6455
Location: Auckland, New Zealand

PostPosted: Sun 08 Jan 2012, 06:28    Post subject:  

Quote:
Trust me Tor is indeed a trap set by the government they can see you.

Certainly not without any references.

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catpuppy

Joined: 05 Jan 2012
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Sun 08 Jan 2012, 06:30    Post subject:  

Trust me Tor is indeed a trap set by the government they can see you.
It's build by the NSA.

See here:

http://cryptome.org/0004/tor-is-tor.htm

True crypt they say it's open source but where's the source code?

See here:

http://www.privacylover.com/encryption/analysis-is-there-a-backdoor-in-truecrypt-is-truecrypt-a-cia-honeypot


Also Utorrent the most used torrent client for windows is free but it contains backdoor like many other software!

http://diskcryptor.net/forum/index.php?topic=482.0

It's like they give us candy but when whe eat from it, it has a hidden insect.

Don't use the following applications if you care about privacy,
I'll try to keep it up to date.

Utorrent
Dropbox
Truecrypt
Windows os
gmail
Bittorent
Facebookcrap
Anything from google
Comodo firewall
Mcafee
Tor

Last edited by catpuppy on Sun 08 Jan 2012, 06:36; edited 1 time in total
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disciple

Joined: 20 May 2006
Posts: 6455
Location: Auckland, New Zealand

PostPosted: Sun 08 Jan 2012, 06:32    Post subject:  

?!
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nooby

Joined: 29 Jun 2008
Posts: 10557
Location: SwedenEurope

PostPosted: Sun 08 Jan 2012, 08:00    Post subject:  

catpuppy, how do you know what you claim?
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