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 Forum index » House Training » HOWTO ( Solutions )
Repairing broken computer pieces (plastic, etc.)
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Dewbie

Joined: 15 Apr 2010
Posts: 1783

PostPosted: Wed 23 Jun 2010, 03:19    Post subject:  Repairing broken computer pieces (plastic, etc.)
Subject description: Share your ideas here!
 

While replacing a bad processor fan, I broke the plastic fan housing into several pieces, as it was quite brittle from age.

I had previously purchased a bottle of Plastic Weld for another project, so I gave it a try, and it worked (wonderfully!): http://www.plastruct.com/Pages/CementGuide.html
It also works well on broken CD cases, if you don't mind the compromised appearance.
(In the States, Plastic Weld is about $4 to $5 at hobby shops.)

However, it won't work with engineered plastics (nylon, etc.) commonly found in printer gears.

But here's another approach: If the printer gear, for example, has an internally splined collar (with stripped-out splines), you can sometimes--if space permits--drill two holes through the wall of the collar, directly in line with (i.e., across from) each other.

Then put the gear on its shaft, and mark and drill a corresponding hole through the shaft, so that it lines up with the holes that were drilled through the gear.

Then use a fastener (such as a pin or screw) to pin the gear to the shaft.

Last edited by Dewbie on Fri 09 Sep 2011, 18:26; edited 2 times in total
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RetroTechGuy


Joined: 15 Dec 2009
Posts: 2668
Location: USA

PostPosted: Wed 23 Jun 2010, 12:33    Post subject: Re: How to repair broken plastic on your computer / printer  

Dewbie wrote:
While replacing a bad processor fan, I broke the plastic fan housing into several pieces, as it was quite brittle from age.

I had previously purchased a bottle of Plastic Weld for another project, so I gave it a try, and it worked (wonderfully!): http://www.plastruct.com/Pages/CementGuide.html
(In the States, it's about $4 to $5 at hobby shops.)

However, it won't work with engineered plastics such as printer gears.

But here's another approach: If the printer gear, for example, has an internally splined collar (with stripped-out splines), you can sometimes--if space permits--drill two holes through the wall of the collar, directly in line with (i.e., across from) each other.

Then put the gear on its shaft, and mark and drill a corresponding hole through the shaft, so that it lines up with the holes that were drilled through the gear.

Then use a fastener (such as a pin or screw) to pin the gear to the shaft.


Another product line is from JB.

The standard JB weld will produce a hard, workable surface on many items. And if you need something more putty-like, try the Water Weld:

http://jbweld.net/products/water.php

This turns into a hard, rock-like plastic. Still machinable, but much more brittle than most epoxies.
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lwill


Joined: 13 Jun 2008
Posts: 173
Location: City Of Lights

PostPosted: Wed 23 Jun 2010, 16:15    Post subject:  

Gears are often some form of nylon which does not glue well at all.
Instead of attaching it directly to the shaft, in the past I have successfully drilled holes though the pieces and "stitched" or "laced" them together with fine wire or "zip" ties. Then if needed, apply epoxy or JB Weld over the whole area to act as a stiffening "splint" while the wire fastens the parts together. (it holds to and around the wire / ties)

Pretty off topic for a linux forum, but just another reason to love Puppy!
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Dewbie

Joined: 15 Apr 2010
Posts: 1783

PostPosted: Thu 24 Jun 2010, 23:29    Post subject:  

Quote:
Pretty off topic for a linux forum, but just another reason to love Puppy!


I was trying to decide whether to post this topic--whether it's really relevant--before realizing that the very essence of Puppy is to keep the old stuff going. So why not?
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pishta

Joined: 27 Jun 2010
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Mon 28 Jun 2010, 15:19    Post subject: acetone  

If you have a spare part that is broken also, ie. a plastic CPU retainer) you can cut it up in small pieces, as small as you can or even shavings, and put it into a small container of acetone. The acetone will melt the plastic into a goo and you can then adjust with acetone to a toothpaste like consistency. You can then mold or patch with this and itll dry to the same starting media. Works great with ABS car grills and many other plastics (be careful with acetone as even the vapors will cloud clear plastic in concentration)
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infromthepound

Joined: 12 Jun 2009
Posts: 133

PostPosted: Thu 01 Jul 2010, 07:45    Post subject:  

I've pulled fans out of old AT power supplys and used them as case fans.
JB
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Frank Cox

Joined: 01 Nov 2009
Posts: 381

PostPosted: Wed 21 Jul 2010, 03:27    Post subject: Thread and Epoxy  

An old trick from building and repairing fishing rods is to use thread embedded with epoxy, Cotton coated nylon sewing thread works well as does the braided nylon offshore fishing line. Actually any braided nylon line will work. For big items mason's line is the way to go.
I have used it to repair all sorts of things. The last one was a Thermax Vacuum cleaner top that was broken nearly in half and the center cylinder that accepts the hose was in four separate pieces. It is now much stronger than it ever was and I saved 50 bucks on a new one!
Also used it to repair a refrigerator that the plastic retainer for the door shelf had broken in half.

The most amazing repair I made was an antique cast iron fishing reel that the housing that connects reel to rod had broken in half , that was 30 years ago and it still works!

Don't recall ever using it on a computer but if you can rap thread around it this method will make it incredible strong, When I repaired a lot of rods I made a jig that spun the rods and pulled the string through the epoxy but simply rapping the thread tight and then using a disposable plastic knife or plastic putty knife will do the trick. Just mix the epoxy and work it into the fibers.

It also works on wood. If you use push brooms that snap in two under heavy use rap them in mason's line and epoxy and they will never break again, Actually Elmer's wood glue would probably work.
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kevin bowers

Joined: 20 Dec 2009
Posts: 143

PostPosted: Tue 27 Jul 2010, 23:30    Post subject: Gorilla glue
Subject description: This stuff is better than wood glue.
 

Try the new polyurethane glues, Gorilla glue is the biggest name. Just remember: READ AND FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS! The first bottle I ever bought started by telling you to put on your old painter's clothes. The big thing to remember: dampen one surface, the hardening reaction is catalysed by water. The next is to clamp the two pieces overnight. After that you're done!
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