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 Forum index » Advanced Topics » Hardware » Video
Extended Monitor Possible?
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Q5sys


Joined: 11 Dec 2008
Posts: 1124

PostPosted: Thu 18 Mar 2010, 13:09    Post subject:  

edoc wrote:
So it is merely a matter of loading KDE or GNOME?


Only if the clouds would part and Angels would descend from heaven to serenade me while I work. lol
I had hoped that running KDE or GNOME would have resolved it. However it didnt. I still dont believe its an XORG issue. I'm now leaning to the idea that its a limitation of how Puppy interacts with XORG.

I've posted some Screenshots to show you the effect on my desktop. You can see in the panel that KDE detects both monitors... but it mirrors them, which is why they are stacked. When I go to the thing to extend it... well you can see the dialog. I get the same result whether I use KDE3 or KDE4.
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jemimah


Joined: 26 Aug 2009
Posts: 4309
Location: Tampa, FL

PostPosted: Thu 18 Mar 2010, 13:31    Post subject:  

Try this.
http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?t=47603

Boot with the VGA connected. It'll only extend the desktop if both resolutions fit in the "max screen" size. I'm still trying to figure out how it computes the max screen size.
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jemimah


Joined: 26 Aug 2009
Posts: 4309
Location: Tampa, FL

PostPosted: Thu 18 Mar 2010, 13:47    Post subject:  

Ok I figured it out. You need to edit your xorg.conf and specify the virtual screen size like so.

Code:
SubSection "Display"
Viewport   0 0
Depth     24
#....there might be some more entries. Add the following line
Virtual 2880 1050
EndSubSection


Pick a size that both monitors fit in. Then you can use zarfy to configure where you want the monitors to be.
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Q5sys


Joined: 11 Dec 2008
Posts: 1124

PostPosted: Thu 18 Mar 2010, 14:19    Post subject:  

jemimah,
I tried it out but it didnt work for me.
Info: Laptop Screen = 1280x768, External 1024x768
Booted with VGA attached, xorgwizard detected monitor @ 1024x768.
Loaded WM, ran zarfy, and still only got mirroring no extension. (however zarfy did detect the different resolutions of my screens just like KDE does)
Then Edited the conf and ran zarfy... still only got mirroring.
I was unable to move the screens around and position them.
Then restarted X with changes to xorg.conf and X refused to load, until I reset it to its original settings.
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jemimah


Joined: 26 Aug 2009
Posts: 4309
Location: Tampa, FL

PostPosted: Thu 18 Mar 2010, 14:39    Post subject:  

You have to move the little red and blue boxes around, it can be tricky to drag them. It does work, I just tested.

Zarfy sort of freaks out if you make the virtual screen size too big or oddly shaped so be sure to maximize its window so you can see it all.

Or you can just use xrandr from the command line to do the same thing.
http://blog.tripmeter.in/2009/04/setting-up-extended-monitor-on-fedora-core-10-xfce/
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Q5sys


Joined: 11 Dec 2008
Posts: 1124

PostPosted: Thu 18 Mar 2010, 14:48    Post subject:  

jemimah wrote:
You have to move the little red and blue boxes around, it can be tricky to drag them. It does work, I just tested.

Yea I tried dragging them around on my system... they didnt move at all. I dont have time to test more now, but its possible that something else on my system is the reason its not working.

I've run xandr before and it detects both monitors. I'll fool around with it more when I have the time.
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bones01

Joined: 11 Aug 2008
Posts: 374
Location: Melbourne, Aus

PostPosted: Mon 12 Apr 2010, 17:50    Post subject:  

Thanks for the comments and advice found here. I'll give them a try today and see how things go.

I'm using xvesa, so not real confident of success. No harm in trying though.

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Cadejo

Joined: 29 Jun 2009
Posts: 69

PostPosted: Fri 21 Mar 2014, 18:15    Post subject:  

Team,

I found this in searching for the answer, and it worked!

Check it out.
[url] http://www.thinkwiki.org/wiki/Xorg_RandR_1.2#the_Virtual_screen [/url]

It outlines the general concept of a virtual screen that XORG uses. In it, it outlines an example, exceprt from the site:

"To turn the VGA monitor back on, with its viewport to the right of the laptop monitor:

Code:
 $  xrandr --output VGA --auto --right-of LVDS


This will probably give an error message similar to:

Code:
 xrandr: screen cannot be larger than 1600x1600 (desired size 2624x1200)
"

It then points you to make an entry in the "screen" section in /etc/X11/xorg.conf



Code:
  # ADD A VIRTUAL LINE TO PROVIDE FOR THE LARGEST SCREENS YOU WILL HOTPLUG
           Virtual              2048 2048


Anyways, JWM freaks out so I wrote a quick bash and put it in my start up.


Code:
#! /bin/sh
xrandr --output LVDS --auto --right-of VGA-0
jwm -restart


don't to forget to chmod +x the script! I hope this works for you all.
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marcos90

Joined: 07 Sep 2011
Posts: 108

PostPosted: Sat 26 Apr 2014, 16:00    Post subject:  

-Precise latest version
-Lcd monitor 17 inch and LED monitor 26 inch .
-Motherboard Intel with integrated D-sub and HDMI .

For me , this was the best solution . I wanted an extended monitor without installing complicated softwares or drivers like nvidia stuff .
The only "difficult" part was as mentionated before was the "drag" to configure the layout position .


jemimah wrote:
Try this.
http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?t=47603

Boot with the VGA connected. It'll only extend the desktop if both resolutions fit in the "max screen" size. I'm still trying to figure out how it computes the max screen size.
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joe_doorman

Joined: 13 Dec 2015
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sun 13 Dec 2015, 00:51    Post subject:    

Disciple, seems to me your maori is incorrect grammar.


Quote "root: n. the superuser or administrator account that has complete control over everything in the machine. Running as root is a taonga of Puppy Linux users."

Taonga is in fact a War Crime (like the 1988 Mongrel Mob convention), not sure what that has to do with unix or computers..

re Zarfy,

"Edit: I uploaded a stripped version as disciple suggested.",

the 'stripped' version is a "Taonga", it has been 'gang raped'.
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disciple

Joined: 20 May 2006
Posts: 6662
Location: Auckland, New Zealand

PostPosted: Sun 13 Dec 2015, 06:43    Post subject:  

Since this is your first post I'm going to assume you're just trolling. But if your definition is right it isn't my grammar that is wrong.
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Flash
Official Dog Handler


Joined: 04 May 2005
Posts: 11918
Location: Arizona USA

PostPosted: Sun 13 Dec 2015, 10:41    Post subject:  

I googled "taonga definition" and the result I liked best was this one. It rambles around a bit but includes:
Quote:
Words change their meaning over time. According to my dictionaries, taonga has evolved in four stages:

Property procured by the spear, etc.
Property.
Property, treasure.
Treasure.

Once it meant solely property. Now it means solely treasure.

Let's assume that disciple meant treasure.
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James186282


Joined: 08 Sep 2009
Posts: 207
Location: Minnesota

PostPosted: Tue 24 May 2016, 22:18    Post subject:  

I was going to post a question about adding more then two monitors but before I do that for once I'll try to help out with what I know.

In short. in the /etc/X11 directory is this handy text file xorg.conf
This configures your display(s) and informs the system about the hardware thats in your machine. So for example lets say you have a machine with an NVIDA GeForce 7600 video card. Wow! Just like me. Old old old but cool because it has two output connectors. One is the old VGA and the other is the newer DVI cable. So you plug a montor (Lcd whatever) into one connector and use the other to run a second monitor.

When you boot up with the Puppy CD it will run xorgwizard and probably turn on one of them and leave the other one blank (or Possibly just run a copy of the first screen)

Now you run Geany (The text editor) and open up the /etc/X11/xorg.conf As in X(windows)-Org Configure file. In it are some sections that will talk about the hardware. First you have the video card. Here is mine

# ******************************
# Graphics Card NVIDIA 7600 GS *
# ******************************
Section "Device"
Identifier "Card0"
Driver "nvidia"
VendorName "NVIDIA Corporation"
BoardName "GeForce 7600 GS"
BusID "PCI:8:0:0"
EndSection

Anything that starts with the # character is a comment. Just whatever blab you want to write to remind you what it is your doing *Highly recommended

Section and EndSection are what starts and ends the description of something. Like a Device. A device like a video card made by NVIDIA.

Identifier is the name of the device that we will use in some other sections. I named mine Card0 but you can call it myvideocard or zarf or whatever you like.

Driver is the software driver for the card. It is REALLY important to have the correct one. Telling the system to use the mesa or ati driver on an nvidia card is not going to work. xorgwizard found something that works but I bring it up because places like NVIDA are super anal about how their hardware really works so they make a driver thats top secret (and fast) or you can use one that is open source but might not be super speedy. Find out what your card can use and if its worth fooling with. I got all worked up and compiled a native driver for my card and it makes the 3D test spin around faster. *Open a terminal and type glxgears and watch the madness.

VendorName is really not important. You can say its NVIDIA Corporation or if your mad call it NVIDIA Goon Squad. Its not really important.

BoardName is also kind of unimportant. If either of those is used anyplace I haven't found it.

BusID is required only if you have more then one video card. I'm lucky that the NVIDIA has two outputs and its just one card so thats optional. If you need to look up your BusID start a terminal and type lspci
It should show you all the boards plugged into your computer and gives you all sorts of info on what it is who makes it and the busid. If you want to put it in? Go for it. If you don't and there is only one video card it won't matter.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Somewhere at the start of xorg.conf is another section called screen. Here is mine.

# ********************************************
# Dual Headed Nvidia GeForce 7600 GS Display *
# ********************************************
Section "Screen"
Identifier "Screen0"
Device "Card0"
Monitor "Monitor0"
DefaultDepth 24
Option "Stereo" "0"
Option "nvidiaXineramaInfoOrder" "CRT-1"
Option "metamodes" "CRT: 1280x1024 +0+0, DFP: 1280x1024 +1280+0"
SubSection "Display"
Depth 24
EndSubSection
EndSection

Ok its section and endsection just as before. Instead of a device like a video board its the "screen" as in what is plugged into what. This one is not as clear as others but lets explain what its trying to do.

The device is that Circuit board we just defined in the first part. Card0 is the NVIDiA board. Monitor0 is the first Monitor (or LCD Panel etc) thats plugged into the card and we will talk about that next. DefaultDepth is how many colors you want the card to be showing. Old Old Old cards were 8 bits and only showed 256 colours. Most newer ones are 24 bit (Photographic) so we want our card to default to that mode. If your running old stuff that might not work. But its got to be really old.

Option Stereo is a special NVIDIA (only) thing. Its in there just to tell the card that I don't have a 3D screen or XRAY specs so =0 just means turn that fancy stuff off.

Option nvidiaXineramaInfoOrder is another NVIDIA thing. Its an NVIDEA way to tell Xinerama (The dual monitor thing) that the CRT (Which in this case is the VGA cable) is connected to a monitor that we want running in 1280 by 1024 pixel mode. The +0+0 is saying that this monitor is where our desktop starts. *all the way to the top (x) all the way to the left(y) corner of the VGA monitor is zero zero. The DFP is the DVI cabled monitor (or LCD) and I want that to be in 1280 by 1024 pixel mode also. This monitor is to start where the first monitor left off. So if +0+0 is the upper left of the monitor hooked up to the VGA cable the second monitor has its upper left corner at 1280 and its in line with the same top end as the other monitor. So you can think of it as two 1280x1024 displays side by side. COOL!

I'm not sure why we have a SubSection that tells us (Again) that its 24 bit colour mode but in some setups (Non NVIDIA) this sets depth and the 1280x1024 mode (or 800x600 or 1600x1280 etc)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
There is another section that talks about the actual monitor (LCD panel)
Here is one of mine. This is the monitor that connects to the DVI cable so its not vital that I explain to xorg what its capable of doing. The DVI cable has the smarts to talk to the monitor and ask it what it can do. But I did it anyway.

# **********************************************************************
# Compaq TFT-1720 Monitor.
# **********************************************************************
Section "Monitor"
# DisplaySize xxx xxx # screen dimensions in mm to get virtual dpi value
Identifier "Monitor3"
VendorName "COMPAQ"
ModelName "TFT-1720"
DisplaySize 340 270
HorizSync 30.0 - 80.0
VertRefresh 56.0 - 76.0
Option "DPMS" # Energy Star able.
EndSection

# starts a comment. It doesn't have to be the first character in the line. I mention this because I like to have a note that explains something like the line where Option is set to "DPMS" If I didn't put in a note telling me that this is to tell xorg that my monitor is fancy enough to dial back on the wattage when I'm not using it I would go crazy asking myself if DPMS was D.efective P.oop M.y S.tink or what?
So its the same Section at the start and EndSection at the end. This section is to inform xorg that we are spelling out the technical capabilities of a Monitor. Where do you get this? Why in the owners manual that we threw away when we first opened the box! Fortunately you can type in the model number into Google and find manuals or even just a tech review that has all the right numbers to poke in.

DisplaySize is commented out. The DVI cable tells xorg just about everything. What this is just the viewable area in millimeters. So get out your Metric tape measure and you can put this number in. If xorg doesn't know the answer? It will still run but the DPI won't be perfect and it will complain in the log file it writes when xorg puzzles over your xorg.conf file. *Note the log file is in the /ver/log directory and the name of the file is Xorg.0.log If you open that with a text editor like Geany you can find out whats going on. *Very valuable tool.

The next line is Identifier. This is just a name. I gave it a dumb generic name "Monitor3" because I wasn't creative enough to give it a good name like Compaq1720 or something that tells you what it is. This is used later (Like naming our NVIDIA board Card0) Soooo this is important but it can be whatever you want to call it.
VendorName is not important. I put in COMPAQ because the monitor is from someones old COMPAQ computer. ModelName is not really used but this is what the thing is so I thought why not? DisplaySize OOPS! I did put it in. The commented out line is a duplicate but its not read. This is just saying the viewable area is 340mm x 270. So when you run it in 1280x1024 mode xorg can figure out what the DPI (Dots per inch) is and give you a what you see is what you get 1:1 view. That what WYSIWYG is btw. The next line is the Horizontal syn range. This is how fast the monitor can spray dots out horizontally. The faster you can run HSYNC the higher the resolution. The range of this monitor probably limits the display to 1280 mode or maybe 1600x1280 but nothing higher. VertRefresh is how many times per second can we repaint the screen. If you run a display where your repainting the screen at less then 60 times a second you will see it flicker like an old time movie projector (It looks crappy) If you can go faster like 75 times a second it makes what your seeing on an old time tube monitor look better then good. Like etched in stone.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ok, so you need to have one place that needs to pull this together with what your using as a mouse (touch pad? Light pen???) what kind of Keyboard your beating on and so forth. I won't go on about defining the mouse and keyboard. Whats already in your xorg.conf is probably done for you and since you know how to do monitors and video boards (Graphics Controllers) this will be pretty easy to understand. Anyway this pulls it together. Its called the ServerLayout and here is mine.

Section "ServerLayout"
Identifier "Default Layout"
Screen 0 "Screen0" 0 0
InputDevice "Keyboard0" "CoreKeyboard"
InputDevice "Mouse0" "CorePointer"
EndSection

You know that Section and EndSection are the start and end of the "ServerLayout" I "think" Default Layout could be called anything. Old Brown Shoe 400 maybe. But what it is? Is that its the default layout so later on someone looking at it can go "hummmmm that must be the default layout of this guys computer."
InputDevices are as we mentioned earlier lines that spell out to xorg what the mouse and keyboard are and CoreKeyboard i and CorePointer are important. They have to be named that. Keyboard0 is defined elsewhere but you could name it MyKeyboard and ThatMousething and it would be fine just so long as you name it that when you define them. The important line is Screen. The number after screen can be thought of as the Video boards number. I have one in the old Dell so we start at 0? Like 0 1 2 3 if we had 4 different cards. Why start at 0? Why ask? Screen0 is what we called our multimonitor lashup. This might be better named but thats my xorg.conf name and I'm sticking with it. The 0 0 is again what the upper left part of the screen is located at. 0 0 is a good thing. You can poke in different numbers and have parts of your screen out of view and you won't be able to see things. Great huh? 0 0 is a good thing.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ok, there is some very important stuff that has to be set and frankly I know enough about it just to know screwing around with it is a good way to goof everything up. I'll bring up one thing that you want to be sure is on. Its in theServerFlags section and here is a copy of mine.

Section "ServerFlags"
# Uncomment this to disable the <Crtl><Alt><Fn> VT switch sequence
# (where n is 1 through 12). This allows clients to receive these key
# events.
# Option "DontVTSwitch"
# Enables mode switching with xrandr
# There is a report that this can cause Xorg not to work on some
# video hardware, so default is commented-out...
# but i want to use it in xorgwizard so leave on...
# with the old Xorg behavior (pre-7.4)...
# Option "AllowMouseOpenFail" "true"
# Xorg 7.4, Ubuntu Jaunty, CTRL-ALT-BACKSPACE is disabled by default...
Option "RandR" "on"
# With this, Xorg won't talk to HAL to add evdev devices and you'll be back
Option "AutoAddDevices" "false"
# For no-Hal, kirk also suggests this...
Option "DontZap" "false"
EndSection

most of it is commented out but the Option to turn RandR on is a 9.95 on the cool-o-meter. But this post is already book length so once you all recover from me sending something other then a question I'll post some examples of how you can "play" with your monitors by rearanging them, rotating them and my favorite... Creating a huge Virtual screen and see what hardware panning is like... "Scroll bars?!? We don't need no stinkin scroll bars!"

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disciple

Joined: 20 May 2006
Posts: 6662
Location: Auckland, New Zealand

PostPosted: Tue 24 May 2016, 23:13    Post subject:  

With an nvidia card I've always used the proprietary driver and nvidia-settings.
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James186282


Joined: 08 Sep 2009
Posts: 207
Location: Minnesota

PostPosted: Wed 25 May 2016, 21:31    Post subject:  

disciple wrote:
With an nvidia card I've always used the proprietary driver and nvidia-settings.


Right on! I downloaded the Native driver from NVIDIAs old card archive. To compile it you need to exit to the command line (No X) and be sure you have all the Kernel files and devx to do the compiling. It had a learning curve but I've moved that card from one machine to another so its becoming a lot less confusing.

I've been trying to get a second card going to have a three monitor lash up but all I have are different brand PCI cards. I can take out the NVIDIA card and get Puppy up with the card but mixing them seems to be more difficult then it looks. I tried to get the mother board video to run by fiddling with the BIOS. Some character on Youtube shows how he does that but I think his motherboard is new and improved. My equipment is all old (But nice for running Puppy fast) I'm wondering if the problem is having two drivers from two different companies or if its something dumb I'm doing.

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