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 Forum index » House Training » HOWTO ( Solutions )
how to install Android Studio and Genymotion in puppy linux
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kalimorphe

Joined: 15 Mar 2016
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Sun 01 May 2016, 19:49    Post subject:  how to install Android Studio and Genymotion in puppy linux  

Hi this my Puppy linux after I installed Android Studio and Genymotion on it
It's very fast than my windows installation
Now I can code and run and debug smoothlly Very Happy
this is a video that to how it is fast Very Happy
https://www.youtube.com/embed/sqZJkTE9xEk

you can see this post how to do it
http://highteckblog.blogspot.com/2016/05/speed-up-android-studio-by-installing.html
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Atle

Joined: 19 Nov 2008
Posts: 588
Location: Oslo, Norway

PostPosted: Mon 02 May 2016, 08:50    Post subject:  

Wow this is nice...

Hope to see more from you mr...


Atle
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mikeslr


Joined: 16 Jun 2008
Posts: 1409
Location: 500 seconds from Sol

PostPosted: Tue 03 May 2016, 15:00    Post subject: Possible Alternatives  

Hi kalimorphe,

Very nice finds. Thanks for bringing them to our attention.

Just wanted to suggest some alternatives. I followed your links to the videos and watched them. The author of the second video recommends the use of a Full Install, with android-sdk, android-studio and genymotion being installed into it.

From experience, both android-sdk and android-studio can be downloaded and unpacked onto any Linux formatted partitions and run from there. [I did not download genymotion. $412 per year per user is a little steep. My interest isn't to create android apps –the objective of geanymotion--but rather to port Puppy Linux to an Android Tablet].

One potential problem with using a Full Install arises because unlike Linux distros which require a Full install, Puppy Linux lacks their full featured package management systems. Applications installed into a Puppy Full Install, and particularly modifications made to those applications may be “un-doable”. Un-installing an application from a Full Puppy Install isn't the simple matter of running synaptic or apt-get. It may require hunting down and deleting every file which the application installed. And deleting those files doesn't automatically re-install any file which was over-written. You may end up with a broken system which would require wiping the system from its partition and re-installing Puppy and the applications you want from scratch.

I'd suggest as one alternative employing a Frugal Install with a SaveFolder. Like a Full Install, such Puppy will need to be on a Linux Formatted partition. But unlike a Full Install, it does not require the entire partition: only a folder. As applications are installed, the SaveFolder will expand to occupy the entire partition if needed, but only if needed. But unlike a Full Install, mistakes don't threaten you entire system or your applications. With the exception of the SaveFolder –into which applications are installed-- your system would consist of READ-ONLY files. A SaveFolder, itself, being a folder can be backed-up. If a problem arises, it is a simple matter to delete a problem SaveFolder and substitute it with the backup.

A second alternative would be to restructure android-sdk and android-studio as SFSes to be loaded and unloaded as necessary. It should be possible during such restructuring to separate out any “work areas” within those applications from the files they need to run. Doing that would prevent any mistakes from corrupting the applications themselves since SFSes are –except for internal work areas-- READ-ONLY.

The downside of such SFSes is that they can not be easily upgraded. On the other hand, there is no need to upgrade them. Rather, different versions can each be built as their own SFS, to be loaded and unloaded as needed.

With android-sdk and android-studio as SFSes, Puppies can be run as Frugal Installs with SaveFiles, configured to only Save manually, without fearing that any experiment you undertake –even the most bizarre you dreamed up in the middle of the night-- won't break your system or your application.

mikesLr
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Atle

Joined: 19 Nov 2008
Posts: 588
Location: Oslo, Norway

PostPosted: Tue 03 May 2016, 17:04    Post subject:  

Such a SFS is wanted dead or alive Smile
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gcmartin


Joined: 14 Oct 2005
Posts: 6513
Location: Earth

PostPosted: Thu 05 May 2016, 14:55    Post subject: +1 PuppyLinux solution for managing & extending IoT devices
Subject description: This is a prior example of having a solution from this community
 

This is excellent, showing a way to have PUPPY generate needs for devices purchased or brought home for various home needs.

I would also like to share, just in case it was overlooked, that @BarryK has created a Puppy distro, Appril, that is a OOTB, running development platform for Puppy, Linux, Android and Apple.

Its problem is that there is no video and very little known in this Forum community. I view it as1 year ahead of its "Puppy discovery time" as more and more need for such in the home is needed.

If for no other reason, it bears a look at it. Boot it. If you have any experience with mobile development, you will notice the minor additions it needs for it to be a true 2016 Pup platform for home use with all elements for mobile generation needs we could ever have.

This is NOT a request to shift gears, as it is a post to alert that there is a PUP which can be easily viewed that has the foundation for IoT and mobile needs as well as having a Puppy Linux look, feel, and operation.

Alert: The one item that was overlooked in this distro was "Touch"! And any new distro MUST incorporate "touch" as now 5.3 billion smartPhones, smartTables, smartDevices and AIO laptops/convertables/2in1s are now in the world with touch. Touch and gesture control is everywhere. I can, now, open my car/SUV doors with a gesture for those who see the world's movement.

Hope this is helpful

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mikeslr


Joined: 16 Jun 2008
Posts: 1409
Location: 500 seconds from Sol

PostPosted: Fri 06 May 2016, 18:21    Post subject: Setting Up Android Studio -- 2nd thoughts  

Hi All,

I've played with android-sdk and android-studio some more. I can now see why a Full Install was recommended. I think the author failed to mention two very important requirements: You need a great deal of storage space and the more RAM the better. And it probably doesn't hurt to have a powerful CPU. Just starting either on a system employing AMD Phenom II X4 920 @ 2.8GHz and 4 Gb or RAM had Htop jumping back and forth from 25 % to 60 % during the installation of selectable components. Operations, thereafter, appear to be at about 7% over Tahrpup64's base CPU usage of 3%.

I run Frugal Installs with a SaveFile and with Automatic Save removed. If you unfamiliar with thie method of operation see, http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=662326#662326. Both these applications require the presence of the Java framework. Oscartalks' jdk-8u77-i586.sfs works fine. But I have to remember to load it Embarassed and if I want it loaded at bootup to execute a Manual Save. jdk-8u77-i586.sfs occupies 176 Mb of my /mnt/home partition.

In this environment, in the absence of SFSes of these applications, the best way for me to run them is as Program Folders. A Program Folder is simply a Folder outside of “Puppy Space” --i.e., its SFSes including any SaveFile and SaveFolder-- containing the entirety of an application with that application being run by Puppy either by browsing to the application's executable and clicking it, or creating symbolic links to within Puppy's executable path, and optionally a menu entry.

It is relatively easy to set Android-sdk and Android-studio up as Program Folders. Android-sdk is packaged/downloadable as a compressed file using tgz compression. Android-studio is packaged/downloadable as a zip-compressed file. Just download these files to a convenient place [you'll need considerable space and I suggest a Linux Formatted partition], right-click them and from the pop-up menu select UExtract files. Folders with the endings “extracted” will be created. Within one such folder you will find another folder named Android-studio. It can simply be moved to a Linux-formatted partition, in my case /mnt/home. In the other extracted folder will be a folder named “android-sdk-linux”. I right-clicked that folder and renamed it to just android-sdk, and moved the renamed folder to /mnt/home. I then deleted what remained of the extracted folders, but kept the downloaded files “just in case”.

As extracted, the Android-Studio folder required just over 400 Mb of storage. I haven't played with it much, but what little I've done suggests: (a) It is a front-end GUI to facilitate the use of android-sdk; and (b) it may be possible to restructure it as an SFS. Only one folder, named “plugins” appears to take installable options. SFSes, however, are compressed READ-ONLY files. So either all desired plugins would have to be installed before an SFS is built, or some method (such as discussed below) has to be fashioned to link Android-studio to its “plugins” folder outside its SFS.

The Android-sdk folder initially occupied 660 Mbs of storage. To run it, I browsed to /mnt/home/android-sdk/tools and Left-Clicked a Bash-Script file named “android”. Various files relating to Android 6, Marshmallow, had already be installed. I'm not interested in Android 6. My Lg gPad 8.0. f uses Android 5.0.1. It is important to note that neither running android-studio nor android-sdk was I able to find any method by which components already installed, or later installed, could be uninstalled.

Scanning the list of what had already been installed and what components could be installed, I discovered that the components relating to Android 5.0.1 (as well as, it seems, every previous version of android) could be downloaded and installed. This being my first exposure to updating/upgrading android-sdk, I decided to install every component and tool which seemed might be useful.

Downloading those components and tools took some time and required that I reboot the computer twice, starting android-sdk after each reboot. Rebooting was necessary because although I have 4 Gb of RAM, the downloaded files were cached in /root which, initially in a Frugal Puppy, is in RAM. Consequently, it was necessary to reboot in order to clear RAM of cached files. Hence my observation, the more RAM the better.

When all downloads were completed, the android-sdk folder occupied 53 Gb of storage.

I deleted that folder and started again. This time I only chose to upgrad/update/install tools and components I thought might be necessary. I'm sure I failed to include some. Even so, when finished the android-sdk folder occupied 3600 Mb. And remember, at least in theory, this setup of android-sdk would only be able to provide the environments for developing app under Android 6 and Android 5.0.1.

It would not be possible to just package android-sdk as an SFS. However, it might be possible to create a structure similar to that used in portable-wine. Running wine presents a similar problem. The installation, itself, takes up little space. But XP applications you install are installed into a “false” drive_c. Ordinary wine applications create that c: drive in /root/.wine –hence, copied into RAM when wine and its applications are called. Portable-wine, however, creates a external-to-Puppy-space folder, within which are a wine.sfs (compressed as are all SFSes) and a folder named wine-data, within which is the false drive_c, not compressed. XP applications are installed into wine-data's drive_c. Not compressed, it can expand as needed to the full extent of the partition on which it is located.

The bash-scripting portable-wine uses to enable the application sfs to open the programs in /wine-data is far beyond my ability.

That said, by this time I think running android-sdk and android-studios as Program Folders may have an advantage over running them in a Full-Install, a Frugal-Install with a SaveFolder, or even as SFSes (if possible). Installation of android-sdk and android-studio into a Full-Install, the SaveFolder of a Frugal Install or the theoretical “data-folder” of a portable-wine-like structure permits only one instance of such applications. As mentioned, there appears to be no facility to uninstall any of these applications components. And the installation process by its very nature will “scatter” the included files throughout the file structure of the Full-Install, SaveFolder or “data-folder”. Removing a broken or flawed build or component may not be as simple as running PPM>Uninstall.

Program Folders are, however, self-contained. As mentioned at the very beginning, I was able to rename the android-sdk-linux folder by deleting the “-linux”. It would have been just as easy to rename it “android-sdk-5.0.1”. Ergo, it is possible to have as many android-sdk program folders --each with its unique name, each providing a different build environment-- as you want. The user, obviously, can decide which of several android-sdk implementations he wants to directly run. Moreover, Android-studio provides two methods by which a specific android-sdk implementation is selected. (Discussed below).

Frugal Puppies are designed ot employ a “merged = layeredfile system”. See http://murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=862192#862192 . It suffices for this discussion to note that (1) at least initially every thing you download and every change you make exist only in RAM. [Which is probably another reason why the author of the video noted how quickly Puppy works compared to other operating systems]. And (2) when started both android-sdk and android-studio create folders which are to contain their config files, cache files and some other folders and files in /root. Root, however, in Puppy's layered file system is initially only in RAM. Which is why once their cache's have used all available RAM, Puppy issues a warning to reboot in order to clear caches. If, as with my system, Puppy is set up not to automatically Save, rebooting not only clears RAM of its cache, it also clears RAM of the setting you've made for these applications. To avoid, or at at least minimize, these problems I applied the same technique used to avoid problems with firefox, seamonkey and palemoon.

1. Start each application: each will create a folder in /root (currently only in RAM). Before doing anything else, shut each program down.
2. Open a file-manager window to /root and show “hidden files”. Using rox, that means left-click “the eye”. You should now see two folders, one named .android and the other named .AndroidStudio2.1. Note the dots.
3. Open a second file-manager window to the android-sdk folder; in my case /mnt/home/android-sdk. Again, show hidden files.
4. Place your mouse-cursor on the .android folder in /root; left-press, hold and then drag that folder to the android-sdk folder and select Move. Then left-press, hold and then drag that .android folder back to /root and select Link(relative). You've physically moved the .android folder out of RAM, onto Storage-Media, and created a symlink to it in /root. Puppy and applications running under it will automatically follow the link and perform as if the folder and its contents were still in /root.

5. Remember to SAVE.
6. Change the focus of your second file-manager window from android-sdk to android-studio.
7. Place your mouse-cursor on .AndroidStudio2.1 in /root and –following the procedure in Step 4, move it to android-studio, creating a symlink to it in /root.
8. Save and reboot.

[With automatic Saves being avoided, (see link above) and datafiles always stored outside of one's SaveFile, it is recommended that Saves be performed as soon after a reboot as possible, after making any of the following changes: installation of new applications; changes to setting, the SFS-loading of applications you want to be available at bootup; and the movement of files and folders out of RAM to Storage with symlinks back. The Save operation is not particular. When executed, it Saves whatever happens to be in RAM at that time to your SaveFile –the good, the bad and the ugly].

I haven't played with android-studio enough to know if it provides any advantages of android-sdk in setting up an android-sdk environment. As far as I can tell, their GUIs and procedures are identical. However, by default android-studio expects to find the android-sdk folder in /root. Since it isn't there, left to its own devices, android-sdk will download files to build it there. Which, of course, is not what you want.

To avoid that, when Android-studio opens, decline the default “Next” option and select “Cancel”. Accept the Offer to re-run Setup Wizard on Startup and click OK. The next GUI which opens offers a number of options, among which is “Configure” with a drop-down arrow. Left-click the arrow, and among the choices offered are SDK Manager and Project Defaults>Project Structure. Either will enable you to tell android-studio to use the android-sdk folder you created (in my case, at /mnt/home). That suggests that android-studio can be directed to use any one of several distinct android-sdk folders.

Remember if you change which android-sdk is to be used, the symlink of the previous version should be deleted from /root and the .android folder of the android-sdk to be used linked to /root.

Once you get beyond android-studio's configuration options you will be asked where your project is located, or where you want to place a new project. Although you'll have to use your file-manager to create and name a folder, it can be on any partition. Android-studio's GUI will thereafter enable you to select that folder. Consequently, the work you do will not be jeopardized if it becomes necessary to delete an android-sdk or android-studio implementation which has become problematic and rebuild such application.

In fact, using Program Folders, if you have adequate space on your drives, it is a simple matter to just backup their folders, once you've set them up, to a safe place. Recovering from an application which has become problematic requires no more time nor effort than it takes to delete the problem folder and copy its backup into its former place.

Hope this helps,

mikesLr
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kalimorphe

Joined: 15 Mar 2016
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Sat 07 May 2016, 09:29    Post subject: question ?  

Thank you mikeslr. I see you are more experienced than me.I am newbie in puppy linux . your post is just complete and detailed . tell me if I am wrong in this case it's better to install puppy in full install than frugal install.
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gcmartin


Joined: 14 Oct 2005
Posts: 6513
Location: Earth

PostPosted: Sat 07 May 2016, 14:03    Post subject: Describe the difference between FULL PUP install versus DVD  

Hello @Kalimorphe

DVD/CD/Frugal, all, run with their filesystems in RAM with the ability to save all work to a save-session. The aid in this is that the boot media is, or can be, portable. If you choose to use the boot media on another PC, in most every case, at boot time you select F2, "puppy pfix=ram" and it will boot pristine. This operates under the concept that the PC's RAM is the local peripheral which becomes "kinda" FULL, once booted because the filesystem for operation exist in RAM and looks like a local device during system operations.

Full boots from AND runs totally on your boot local media; namely HDD/SSD/USB/SD. Every change is immediate on media and there is NO save-session concept. The filesystem exist on the media, ONLY. Once installed to local media and used, the concept of getting back to pristine is lost forever. As such, it "brands" itself in the FULL system to the PC you installed to; thus moving the media to another PC would result in you having to "jump thru hoops"; albeit minor, nonetheless, because the chipset is probably different from the PC you originally FULL installed on.

Each approach has its own advantages-disadvantages. So it up to you to choose what you feel is the best approach for your needs. Both yield a running Puppy Linux. Further if you choose to take a particular PUP ISO and install it as FULL, it will have the exact same elements that a DVD/CD/Frugal boot offers. ... EXACT.

Primarily, though they have the same operation and app offering, each mainly differs in RAM use. Theoretically, DVD/CD/Frugal to RAM will perform faster than FULL: With FULL, more stuff can be run simultaneously, overall.

Hope this is helpful

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mikeslr


Joined: 16 Jun 2008
Posts: 1409
Location: 500 seconds from Sol

PostPosted: Sat 07 May 2016, 16:32    Post subject: Frugal Install
Subject description: Eclipse -- the tools for Java developers
 

Hi kalimorphe,

Short answer: Unless your computer has less than 516 Mb of Ram and/or a low powered CPU [in which case it probably doesn't have the capacity to use android-sdk, android-studio in a meaningful manner) a Frugal install is almost always the better choice.

One other exception would be if the software you want to run won't function properly or completely under a Frugal Install. Trying to determine whether that was the case was one reason for my exploration.

Both android-sdk and android-studio seem to be fully functional when run from folders on a Linux-formatted partition when run from a Frugal Install.

Somewhere in the documentation of one or the other I ran across a reference to Eclipse, the tools for Java developers. So I decided to see if there was any problem using that tool from a Frugal Puppy. You can obtain the installer here: https://www.eclipse.org/downloads/download.php?file=/oomph/epp/mars/R2/eclipse-inst-linux32.tar.gz

As in the previous post, I used UExtract to decompress the targ.gz file. I then left-clicked the file named "eclipse-inst" which opened a web-browser with choices of eclipse to install. I chose the first as it appeared the least specific. The installer enabled me to select /mnt/home as the location to install the application. When it asked for a Work Folder, however, I had to open my file manager and create one named "eclipse-workspace". The installer readily accepted that chose. When the installer completed its tasks, I found a folder at /mnt/home named java-mars. Within it was folder named eclipse, and within that a binary named eclipse. Left-clicking it started the application. [Of course, Java has to be present for it to run).

Mars is the current stable version of Eclipse. The java-mars folder with contents took up about 23 Mbs. Unlike my experience with android-sdk, it isn't movable - copyable. Not a great draw-back as I suspect the product of using it will be in the work-folder. So deleting, rebuilding mars-eclipse or even substituting neon-eclipse (due the end of June) will not result in loss of work.

The basic reason I only recommend a Full install for computers which aren't powerful enough to function well using a Frugal Install is that if you make a mistake and install something you shouldn't, or an application makes some change to your setup it is very difficult --sometimes impossible-- to recover.

With a Frugal Install, however, your operating system is made up of READ-ONLY Files; that is you can't change them. The only READ-WRITE file you have is a SaveFile or SaveFolder into which new applications are written. You can easily backup these files before experimenting. You can also avoid automatic-saves to them: the only changes to them are when you choose to do so. So set up, you can install any application and merely "restart-X" or "restart-graphical server" --this causes Puppy to re-examine what now makes up your operating system in RAM-- and test the new application. Shutting down without Saving, wipes it from memory. On reboot, it is as if the new application was never there.

Frugal installs are just great for trying new things; experimenting; pushing the limits of your computer and your own. Having to reformat your partition and re-install a Puppy because you tried something you shouldn't have just isn't what I want from an operating system.

mikesLr
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kalimorphe

Joined: 15 Mar 2016
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Mon 09 May 2016, 15:11    Post subject: thanks  

Thank you mikeslr and gcmartin Very Happy
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