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 Forum index » House Training » Beginners Help ( Start Here)
Does Puppy use the x86-64 extension?
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edmont

Joined: 19 Nov 2012
Posts: 51

PostPosted: Mon 25 Dec 2017, 22:18    Post subject:  Does Puppy use the x86-64 extension?  

I've discovered that my , almost , ancient computer has the x86-64
extension . This appears to be most relevant for how memory is addressed.
This may not mean that this is equivalent to a X64 CPU .

Is there a puppy linux distribution that utilizes this .
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Flash
Official Dog Handler


Joined: 04 May 2005
Posts: 13319
Location: Arizona USA

PostPosted: Mon 25 Dec 2017, 22:55    Post subject:  

What OS are you using now?

Probably the quickest and surely the best way to answer your question is for you to download any 64-bit Puppy and try it.
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bigpup


Joined: 11 Oct 2009
Posts: 12573
Location: S.C. USA

PostPosted: Tue 26 Dec 2017, 03:43    Post subject:  

What is the processor in the computer?

x86-64 extension usually indicates it is a true 64bit processor.

The memory address thing is all about how much memory it can address.

Normal 32bit Linux has a memory address limit of 4GB.
32bit Linux can get around this limit if it is a PAE (Physical Address Extension) version of Linux and the 32bit processor is PAE capable or it is a 64bit processor.
64 GB is the max RAM limit addressable.

64 bit Linux has a memory address limit in the high TB's.

Basically for normal people with normal computers.
If you have more than 4GB of RAM.

You need a 64bit Linux OPS and a 64 bit processor.
OR
A 32bit PAE Linux OPS and a 32bit processor that is PAE capable or a 64bit processor.

.

_________________
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Sailor Enceladus

Joined: 22 Feb 2016
Posts: 1561

PostPosted: Wed 27 Dec 2017, 13:19    Post subject: Re: Does Puppy use the x86-64 extension?  

edmont wrote:
Is there a puppy linux distribution that utilizes this .

Yes, there's some 64-bit puppies here http://puppylinux.com/index.html#download
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Mike Walsh


Joined: 28 Jun 2014
Posts: 5392
Location: King's Lynn, UK.

PostPosted: Fri 29 Dec 2017, 08:10    Post subject:  

Hi, edmont.

It's a case of semantics, TBH.

'x86' refers to the architecture first pioneered by Intel, dating all the way back to the very first Intel 8086 processor, from 1978! See here for a more thorough explanation:-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X86

The 'x86-64' extension came into being with the initial release of the AMD Athlon 64 processor, on September 23rd, 2003. This is why if anybody wants to develop a new 64-bit processor, they need an additional licence from Advanced Micro Devices (AMD).

(Intel got theirs from AMD way back when. 'Twas rather a sore point with them at the time....)

It's also why 64-bit packages throughout the open-source world are always tagged 'amd64', in homage to that very first, mass-produced 64-bit CPU for the consumer market.

'X64' is simply a different label for the exact same architecture. The computer world is full of acronyms and abbreviations, many of which obliquely refer to the same thing; it gets very confusing at times, even for those of us who are 'au fait' with all this guff! In terms of the fast-moving pace of this eco-system, 64-bit is a 'mature' technology; although 2003 was the first year for mass production of these chips, the ideas behind it date back very much further into the past.

---------------------------------------------

64-bit CPUs, when running 64-bit software, are invariably running in what's known as 'Long mode'.....which refers to the fact that they are then utilising not only the 32-bit, but also the 64-bit internal address registers. This is a practice which persists to this day, even with the new AMD 'Ryzen' chips & the Intel core-i9s.

Intel attempted to bring to market a totally different 64-bit architecture known as 'Itanium' back in the very late 90s/early 'noughties'. It was based on development work undertaken by Hewlett-Packard, dating back to the end of the 1980s. It's known as 'IA-64'.....which is similar to the commonly-used 'IA-32', though almost non-existent in the consumer marketplace. At the time of its introduction, it was too radical for the market, and never really gained acceptance; Intel quietly dropped it for consumers, and wrote it off as a flop. It has, however, been further jointly developed by HP/Intel as a specialised architecture for enterprise & server-class machines, and is still in use today in HP's top-end 'Z-series' workstations.....although Intel signalled the 'end of the line' for Itanium not long ago, with the release of 'Kittson' back in February - a re-vamp of the previous 'Poulsboro' core stepping.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Itanium

--------------------------------------------

My old Compaq desktop, produced by Compaq themselves shortly before they were bought out by HP, uses an Athlon 64 X2 dual-core, with those 'x86-64' extensions.....the very first of its type released to market. It's perfectly capable of running 64-bit Puppies, although I run mostly 32-bit Pups by choice, since they just seem that wee bit faster, and more responsive!

edmont wrote:
I've discovered that my , almost , ancient computer has the x86-64 extension .


'Ancient' is a very relative term. According to folks who want the very latest gear all the time, my old girl should have been put out to pasture nearly a decade ago! But it still runs well, and using a lightweight OS like Puppy is, to my mind, being kinder to elderly hardware than attempting to run a cutting-edge, 'heavy' mainstream distro like Ubuntu or Mint.

--------------------------------------------------

So, yes; if you have a CPU with the 'x86-64' extension, it's 64-bit capable.....and should be able to run 64-bit Pups without issue.

Hope you can make sense of my 'ramblings'..!


Mike. Wink
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