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 Forum index » House Training » Beginners Help ( Start Here)
App windows won't fill screen in tahr 605 (Realy Solved)
Moderators: Flash, Ian, JohnMurga
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rufwoof

Joined: 24 Feb 2014
Posts: 2145

PostPosted: Thu 21 Sep 2017, 19:45    Post subject:  

In the past I've coded something like
Code:
<StartupCommand>sleep 5;xrandr --output HDMI2 --mode 1920x1080 --output DP3 --off</StartupCommand>

into jwm configuration (I use ~/.jwmrc but for standard puppy's you'll probably have to use another included file for that to remain consistently coded i.e. perhaps in ~/.jwm/jwmrc-personal).

The sleep just gives the system a bit of time to settle down before triggering the settings/change. You could also just run
Code:
xrandr --output HDMI2 --mode 1920x1080 --output DP3 --off

from within a terminal

Another way is to encode things in /etc/X11/xorg.conf by adding appropriate Monitor and Screen sections ... something like

Code:
Section "Monitor"
   Identifier   "HDMI2"
   VendorName   "Monitor Vendor"
   ModelName    "Monitor Model"
   Option "PreferredMode" "1920x1080"
EndSection

Section "Screen"
   Identifier "HDMI2"
   SubSection "Display"
            Modes      "1920x1080"
   EndSubSection
EndSection
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number77

Joined: 22 Oct 2010
Posts: 532

PostPosted: Fri 22 Sep 2017, 04:12    Post subject:  

xrandr --output DP3 --off
Doesnt turn DP3 off.
xrandr still says its there.

Is there any way to force DP3, which doesnt exist, to run on same resolution as hdmi screen. 1920x1080x50.
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number77

Joined: 22 Oct 2010
Posts: 532

PostPosted: Fri 22 Sep 2017, 06:13    Post subject:  

theru wrote:
Quote:
HDMI2 connected 1920x1080+0+0 (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 698mm x 392mm
1920x1080 50.0 + 60.0* 59.9 24.0 24.0
1920x1080i 60.1 50.0 60.0
1280x720 60.0 50.0 59.9
1440x576i 50.1
1440x480i 60.1 60.1
720x576 50.0
720x480 60.0 59.9
640x480 60.0 59.9
...
DP3 connected 1024x768+0+0 (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 0mm x 0mm
1024x768 60.0*
800x600 60.3 56.2
848x480 60.0
640x480 59.9


Only 1 screen connected yet xrandr shows 2 ports being connected, one outputting 1920x1080, the other 1024x768.

My experience is that by default the same output is mirrored on both screens but the windows won't expand beyond the borders of the smaller screen.

Assuming the DP3 entry is a false positive it's easy to turn it off:

Code:
xrandr --output DP3 --off


This should turn off the fake screen. It can be checked by running xrandr without any options.

After that all that's left to do is to restart the window manager.

Assuming you are using jwm:

Code:
jwm -restart


A more generic way to restart the window manager is to go to the logout screen and click on Restart window manager.

All new windows opened after this point should resize correctly.

These changes only last for the current session and are reverted every time the computer or xorg server is restarted. So it needs to be run when xorg server is started but before the window manager is loaded.

Since this command is basically a single line I found it better to add it to an existing script. I found a really short one that's called early on.

On my pc the script /root/.xset.sh (hidden file, click the eye icon to reveal) only contains one line:

Code:
xset m 20/10 4 c off r rate 660 25 s off -dpms


The only thing that needs to be done is adding a new line and type the following:

Code:
xrandr --output DP3 --off


When that's done the pc should behave normally every time it's booted.

It works 100%, I forgot to restart the windows manager. When I did everything full screen.
Thats brilliant theru thanks.
I just have to follow the instructions and make it permenant.
Thanks once more.
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theru

Joined: 23 Jul 2015
Posts: 144
Location: Heers, Belgium

PostPosted: Fri 22 Sep 2017, 07:36    Post subject:  

Glad to hear it's working.

When you run xrandr you see a list of available resolutions with a * after the one the screen is currently set to. There is no * when the screen is disabled.

I have noticed that the file xset.sh is rewritten when you run menu -> desktop -> pupx set properties of x and change some settings there. While that won't happen often it still means it's a less than ideal place to make the settings permanent.

The xset.sh command is called by /root/.xinitrc. The xinitrc file is less likely to be rewritten unexpectedly. However you can't just insert the xrandr command anywhere so if you decide to try it it would be best to backup the file first.

The xset.sh command is only called once in xinitrc so it's easy to locate using the find command in a text editor. On my system it's this block of text:

Code:
if [ -f /root/.xset.sh ];then
 #this is created by /usr/bin/pupx...
 eval "/root/.xset.sh"


Just above that entry the xrandr command can be safely inserted.

It will probably look like this:

Code:
xrandr --output DP3 --off

if [ -f /root/.xset.sh ];then
 #this is created by /usr/bin/pupx...
 eval "/root/.xset.sh"


Feel free to send me your xinitrc if you don't feel comfortable to make the changes yourself.
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number77

Joined: 22 Oct 2010
Posts: 532

PostPosted: Fri 22 Sep 2017, 09:22    Post subject:  

Where is xinitrc, a search says it is in /root/.xinitrc. Even with the eye pressed I can't find it in root.
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sheldonisaac

Joined: 21 Jun 2009
Posts: 681
Location: Philadelphia, PA

PostPosted: Fri 22 Sep 2017, 10:00    Post subject:
Subject description: xinitrc
 

number77 wrote:
Where is xinitrc, a search says it is in /root/.xinitrc. Even with the eye pressed I can't find it in root.

In Tahr 32-bit ver 6.0.6, it's
Code:

ls -la /root/.xinitrc
-rwxr-xr-x 1 root root 6261 Feb 20  2017 /root/.xinitrc

_________________
Dell E6410: Slim Slacko 6, LuPu Super 2, Tahr
Dell D610: Windows XP, Puppy Linux 5.2
Intel D865GBF: Tiny Windows 7, Puppy Linux 5.2
Acer Aspire One: Windows XP, Puppy Linux 5.2
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number77

Joined: 22 Oct 2010
Posts: 532

PostPosted: Fri 22 Sep 2017, 11:34    Post subject:
Subject description: xinitrc
 

sheldonisaac wrote:
number77 wrote:
Where is xinitrc, a search says it is in /root/.xinitrc. Even with the eye pressed I can't find it in root.

In Tahr 32-bit ver 6.0.6, it's
Code:

ls -la /root/.xinitrc
-rwxr-xr-x 1 root root 6261 Feb 20  2017 /root/.xinitrc

Sorry sheldonisaac that doesn't mean anything to me, my terminal skills very basic.
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theru

Joined: 23 Jul 2015
Posts: 144
Location: Heers, Belgium

PostPosted: Fri 22 Sep 2017, 13:59    Post subject:  

It's strange that you can't see the file in rox. When you right click and choose display -> sort by name, do you see the file where you would expect it?

When you type the following command in a terminal:

Code:
ls -a /root


you should see a list of all the files/folders in /root. The -a switch also reveals the hidden ones, just like the eye icon in rox.

Most gui programs allow you to open a file from a terminal. Here is an example:

Code:
geany /root/.xinitrc


However this means that if you close the terminal by mistake it will also take the program down. This won't happen when you add a &

Code:
geany /root/.xinitrc&


When you are already in the folder containing the file you won't need to type the full path.
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number77

Joined: 22 Oct 2010
Posts: 532

PostPosted: Fri 22 Sep 2017, 16:01    Post subject:  

I am struggling to make a copy of xinitrc so sending you a copy may take some time.
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theru

Joined: 23 Jul 2015
Posts: 144
Location: Heers, Belgium

PostPosted: Fri 22 Sep 2017, 19:56    Post subject:  

No worries. As far as I know the file xset.sh only gets modified when you use pupx and maybe some options from jwmdesk so it should be relatively safe.

I've noticed that "sort by name" can be interpreted in different ways.

In rox the files are simply sorted alphabetically whether they start with a dot or not.

On other places like the file selection dialog when you are for example adding an attachment the files starting with a dot are grouped separately when they are sorted by name. I have no idea why they are sorted differently but I can see how it can confuse some people.

Only a few extensions are allowed for forum attachments. In the section where you can add an attachment you see a link on the left named Allowed extensions and sizes. When you click on it you'll see a list of allowed extensions.

I can think of 2 ways to add an attachment:

One way is to copy the file to a name with an allowed extension like this:

Code:
cp /root/.xinitrc /root/xinitrc.tar


In this example the copy doesn't start with a dot so it will hopefully be more visible.The copy isn't really a tar file but it is enough to allow it to upload.

Another way is to really make a tar file:

Code:
cd /root
tar -cf xinitrc.tar .xinitrc


This creates an xinitrc.tar archive (-c) and adds .xinitrc to it (-f).
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Flash
Official Dog Handler


Joined: 04 May 2005
Posts: 12668
Location: Arizona USA

PostPosted: Fri 22 Sep 2017, 22:11    Post subject:  

Or you can change the file extension to something the forum allows and explain in the post which kind of file it really is. Actually I've read that Linux pays no attention to filename extensions.

There is a 250 kB limit on attachments.
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theru

Joined: 23 Jul 2015
Posts: 144
Location: Heers, Belgium

PostPosted: Sat 23 Sep 2017, 03:14    Post subject:  

With "change", do you mean "rename" or "copy"?

When I "forgot" to change .xinitrc back to it's original name and restarted xorg the pc shut down instead Shocked
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Flash
Official Dog Handler


Joined: 04 May 2005
Posts: 12668
Location: Arizona USA

PostPosted: Sat 23 Sep 2017, 08:46    Post subject:  

Sorry, I should have said rename, not change.

So I was wrong about Linux not caring about the file name? Or is it just certain apps? In your case, it seems that Xorg was looking for a file with a certain name and couldn't find it, so it locked up. That would be different from what I meant, wouldn't it?
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theru

Joined: 23 Jul 2015
Posts: 144
Location: Heers, Belgium

PostPosted: Sat 23 Sep 2017, 09:46    Post subject:  

I was curious about what would happen if .xinitrc wasn't found.

When I tried inserting the xrandr command closer to the end of the script xorg simply refused to start so I was surprised about the shutdown.

I understand enough about mp or nano to revert these changes without a gui but I don't think number77 would have been that lucky.
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number77

Joined: 22 Oct 2010
Posts: 532

PostPosted: Sat 23 Sep 2017, 15:08    Post subject:  

theru wrote:
Glad to hear it's working.

When you run xrandr you see a list of available resolutions with a * after the one the screen is currently set to. There is no * when the screen is disabled.

I have noticed that the file xset.sh is rewritten when you run menu -> desktop -> pupx set properties of x and change some settings there. While that won't happen often it still means it's a less than ideal place to make the settings permanent.

The xset.sh command is called by /root/.xinitrc. The xinitrc file is less likely to be rewritten unexpectedly. However you can't just insert the xrandr command anywhere so if you decide to try it it would be best to backup the file first.

The xset.sh command is only called once in xinitrc so it's easy to locate using the find command in a text editor. On my system it's this block of text:

Code:
if [ -f /root/.xset.sh ];then
 #this is created by /usr/bin/pupx...
 eval "/root/.xset.sh"


Just above that entry the xrandr command can be safely inserted.

It will probably look like this:

Code:
xrandr --output DP3 --off

if [ -f /root/.xset.sh ];then
 #this is created by /usr/bin/pupx...
 eval "/root/.xset.sh"


Feel free to send me your xinitrc if you don't feel comfortable to make the changes yourself.


I gave up trying to make a copy of xinitrc and took the plunge and inserted your command xrandr --output DP3 --off in it and it now is able to go full screen at every boot.
Brilliant solution theru thank you for spending your time.
Also thank you to everyone else who helped on the way.
All the best.
number 77
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