Puppy Linux Discussion Forum Forum Index Puppy Linux Discussion Forum
Puppy HOME page : puppylinux.com
"THE" alternative forum : puppylinux.info
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

The time now is Thu 24 Jul 2014, 02:43
All times are UTC - 4
 Forum index » Taking the Puppy out for a walk » Announcements
Ext4 ??? ext4 by default - gain 2 to 20 times faster fsck
Moderators: Flash, Ian, JohnMurga
Post new topic   Reply to topic View previous topic :: View next topic
Page 1 of 2 [17 Posts]   Goto page: 1, 2 Next
Author Message
ttuuxxx


Joined: 05 May 2007
Posts: 10747
Location: Ontario Canada,Sydney Australia

PostPosted: Fri 06 Mar 2009, 07:30    Post subject:  Ext4 ??? ext4 by default - gain 2 to 20 times faster fsck  

http://kernelnewbies.org/Ext4
OR
lol
ttuuxxx

1. Introduction

Ext4 is the evolution of the most used Linux filesystem, Ext3. In many ways, Ext4 is a deeper improvement over Ext3 than Ext3 was over Ext2. Ext3 was mostly about adding journaling to Ext2, but Ext4 modifies important data structures of the filesystem such as the ones destined to store the file data. The result is a filesystem with an improved design, better performance, reliability and features.
2. EXT4 features
2.1. Compatibility

Any existing Ext3 filesystem can be migrated to Ext4 with an easy procedure which consists in running a couple of commands in read-only mode (described in the next section). This means that you can improve the performance, storage limits and features of your current filesystems without reformatting and/or reinstalling your OS and software environment. If you need the advantages of Ext4 on a production system, you can upgrade the filesystem. The procedure is safe and doesn't risk your data (obviously, backup of critical data is recommended, even if you aren't updating your filesystem Smile. Ext4 will use the new data structures only on new data, the old structures will remain untouched and it will be possible to read/modify them when needed. This means, that, of course, that once you convert your filesystem to Ext4 you won't be able to go back to Ext3 again (although there's a possibility, described in the next section, of mounting a Ext3 filesystem with Ext4 without using the new disk format and you'll be able to mount it with Ext3 again, but you lose many of the advantages of Ext4).
2.2. Bigger filesystem/file sizes

Currently, Ext3 support 16 TB of maximum filesystem size, and 2 TB of maximum file size. Ext4 adds 48-bit block addressing, so it will have 1 EB of maximum filesystem size and 16 TB of maximum file size. 1 EB = 1,048,576 TB (1 EB = 1024 PB, 1 PB = 1024 TB, 1 TB = 1024 GB). Why 48-bit and not 64-bit? There are some limitations that would need to be fixed before making Ext4 fully 64-bit capable, which have not been addressed in Ext4. The Ext4 data structures have been designed keeping this in mind, so a future update to Ext4 will implement full 64-bit support at some point. 1 EB will be enough (really Smile) until that happens. (Note: The code to create filesystems bigger than 16 TB is -at the time of writing this article- not in any stable release of e2fsprogs. It will be in future releases.)
2.3. Sub directory scalability

Right now the maximum possible number of sub directories contained in a single directory in Ext3 is 32000. Ext4 breaks that limit and allows a unlimited number of sub directories.
2.4. Extents

The traditionally Unix-derived filesystems like Ext3 use a indirect block mapping scheme to keep track of each block used for the blocks corresponding to the data of a file. This is inefficient for large files, specially on large file delete and truncate operations, because the mapping keeps a entry for every single block, and big files have many blocks -> huge mappings, slow to handle. Modern filesystems use a different approach called "extents". An extent is basically a bunch of contiguous physical blocks. It basically says "The data is in the next n blocks". For example, a 100 MB file can be allocated into a single extent of that size, instead of needing to create the indirect mapping for 25600 blocks (4 KB per block). Huge files are split in several extents. Extents improve the performance and also help to reduce the fragmentation, since an extent encourages continuous layouts on the disk.
2.5. Multiblock allocation

When Ext3 needs to write new data to the disk, there's a block allocator that decides which free blocks will be used to write the data. But the Ext3 block allocator only allocates one block (4KB) at a time. That means that if the system needs to write the 100 MB data mentioned in the previous point, it will need to call the block allocator 25600 times (and it was just 100 MB!). Not only this is inefficient, it doesn't allow the block allocator to optimize the allocation policy because it doesn't knows how many total data is being allocated, it only knows about a single block. Ext4 uses a "multiblock allocator" (mballoc) which allocates many blocks in a single call, instead of a single block per call, avoiding a lot of overhead. This improves the performance, and it's particularly useful with delayed allocation and extents. This feature doesn't affect the disk format. Also, note that the Ext4 block/inode allocator has other improvements, described in detail in this paper.
2.6. Delayed allocation

Delayed allocation is a performance feature (it doesn't change the disk format) found in a few modern filesystems such as XFS, ZFS, btrfs or Reiser 4, and it consists in delaying the allocation of blocks as much as possible, contrary to what traditionally filesystems (such as Ext3, reiser3, etc) do: allocate the blocks as soon as possible. For example, if a process write()s, the filesystem code will allocate immediately the blocks where the data will be placed - even if the data is not being written right now to the disk and it's going to be kept in the cache for some time. This approach has disadvantages. For example when a process is writing continually to a file that grows, successive write()s allocate blocks for the data, but they don't know if the file will keep growing. Delayed allocation, on the other hand, does not allocate the blocks immediately when the process write()s, rather, it delays the allocation of the blocks while the file is kept in cache, until it is really going to be written to the disk. This gives the block allocator the opportunity to optimize the allocation in situations where the old system couldn't. Delayed allocation plays very nicely with the two previous features mentioned, extents and multiblock allocation, because in many workloads when the file is written finally to the disk it will be allocated in extents whose block allocation is done with the mballoc allocator. The performance is much better, and the fragmentation is much improved in some workloads.
2.7. Fast fsck

Fsck is a very slow operation, especially the first step: checking all the inodes in the file system. In Ext4, at the end of each group's inode table will be stored a list of unused inodes (with a checksum, for safety), so fsck will not check those inodes. The result is that total fsck time improves from 2 to 20 times, depending on the number of used inodes (http://kerneltrap.org/Linux/Improving_fsck_Speeds_in_Ext4). It must be noticed that it's fsck, and not Ext4, who will build the list of unused inodes. This means that you must run fsck to get the list of unused inodes built, and only the next fsck run will be faster (you need to pass a fsck in order to convert a Ext3 filesystem to Ext4 anyway). There's also a feature that takes part in this fsck speed up - "flexible block groups" - that also speeds up filesystem operations.
2.8. Journal checksumming

The journal is the most used part of the disk, making the blocks that form part of it more prone to hardware failure. And recovering from a corrupted journal can lead to massive corruption. Ext4 checksums the journal data to know if the journal blocks are failing or corrupted. But journal checksumming has a bonus: it allows one to convert the two-phase commit system of Ext3's journaling to a single phase, speeding the filesystem operation up to 20% in some cases - so reliability and performance are improved at the same time. (Note: the part of the feature that improves the performance, the asynchronous logging, is turned off by default for no, and will be enabled in future releases, when its reliability improves)
2.9. "No Journaling" mode

Journaling ensures the integrity of the filesystem by keeping a log of the ongoing disk changes. However, it is know to have a small overhead. Some people with special requirements and workloads can run without a journal and its integrity advantages. In Ext4 the journaling feature can be disabled, which provides a small performance improvement.
2.10. Online defragmentation

(This feature is being developed and will be included in future releases). While delayed allocation, extents and multiblock allocation help to reduce the fragmentation, with usage filesystems can still fragment. For example: You write three files in a directory and continually on the disk. Some day you need to update the file of the middle, but the updated file has grown a bit, so there's not enough room for it. You have no option but fragment the excess of data to another place of the disk, which will cause a seek, or allocate the updated file continually in another place, far from the other two files, resulting in seeks if an application needs to read all the files on a directory (say, a file manager doing thumbnails on a directory full of images). Besides, the filesystem can only care about certain types of fragmentation, it can't know, for example, that it must keep all the boot-related files contiguous, because it doesn't know which files are boot-related. To solve this issue, Ext4 will support online fragmentation, and there's a e4defrag tool which can defragment individual files or the whole filesystem.
2.11. Inode-related features

Larger inodes, nanosecond timestamps, fast extended attributes, inodes reservation...

*

Larger inodes: Ext3 supports configurable inode sizes (via the -I mkfs parameter), but the default inode size is 128 bytes. Ext4 will default to 256 bytes. This is needed to accommodate some extra fields (like nanosecond timestamps or inode versioning), and the remaining space of the inode will be used to store extend attributes that are small enough to fit it that space. This will make the access to those attributes much faster, and improves the performance of applications that use extend attributes by a factor of 3-7 times.
*

Inode reservation consists in reserving several inodes when a directory is created, expecting that they will be used in the future. This improves the performance, because when new files are created in that directory they'll be able to use the reserved inodes. File creation and deletion is hence more efficient.
*

Nanoseconds timestamps means that inode fields like "modified time" will be able to use nanosecond resolution instead of the second resolution of Ext3.

2.12. Persistent preallocation

This feature, available in Ext3 in the latest kernel versions, and emulated by glibc in the filesystems that don't support it, allows applications to preallocate disk space: Applications tell the filesystem to preallocate the space, and the filesystem preallocates the necessary blocks and data structures, but there's no data on it until the application really needs to write the data in the future. This is what P2P applications do in their own when they "preallocate" the necessary space for a download that will last hours or days, but implemented much more efficiently by the filesystem and with a generic API. This have several uses: first, to avoid applications (like P2P apps) doing it themselves inefficiently by filling a file with zeros. Second, to improve fragmentation, since the blocks will be allocated at one time, as contiguously as possible. Third, to ensure that applications has always the space they know they will need, which is important for RT-ish applications, since without preallocation the filesystem could get full in the middle of an important operation. The feature is available via the libc posix_fallocate() interface.
2.13. Barriers on by default

This is an option that improves the integrity of the filesystem at the cost of some performance (you can disable it with "mount -o barrier=0", recommended trying it if you're benchmarking). From this LWN article: "The filesystem code must, before writing the [journaling] commit record, be absolutely sure that all of the transaction's information has made it to the journal. Just doing the writes in the proper order is insufficient; contemporary drives maintain large internal caches and will reorder operations for better performance. So the filesystem must explicitly instruct the disk to get all of the journal data onto the media before writing the commit record; if the commit record gets written first, the journal may be corrupted. The kernel's block I/O subsystem makes this capability available through the use of barriers; in essence, a barrier forbids the writing of any blocks after the barrier until all blocks written before the barrier are committed to the media. By using barriers, filesystems can make sure that their on-disk structures remain consistent at all times."
3. How to use Ext4

This is the first stable version of Ext4, so even if the whole development and release of this filesystems has been slowed down and delayed a lot to guarantee the same level of stability that you'd expect from the current Ext3 implementation, the usual rules of any ".0" software apply.

One very important thing to keep in mind is that there is NOT Ext4 GRUB support. Well, that wasn't exactly true: There is grub support, but it's not very spread in the currently available distros. There's ext4 support in the GRUB2 development branch, but since GRUB2 is not stable, most of distros are using the 0.9x versions.

There are available grub2 packages in Ubuntu and debian-derived distros as the grub-pc package. In the 0.9x branch, there's not official support, but there's a Google SoC project that developed support for it, and Google finds patches. So choose yourself. The next release of distros based in Linux 2.6.28 will probably have support in one way or another. The safe option is to keep your /boot directory in a partition formatted with Ext3.

You also need an updated e2fsprogs tool, of course, the latest stable version -1.41.3- is recommended.

NOTE: At least in debian-derived distros, including Ubuntu, converting your filesystem to Ext4 when using a initramfs results into a non-booting system, apparently even when you enable the "ext4dev compatibility" option". The problem is that the fstype klibc utility detects the ext4 filesystem as ext3, and tries to mount it as ext3, and fails. The fix is to pass the "rootfstype=ext4" option (without the quotes) in the kernel command line.

Switching to Ext4 it's very easy. There are three different ways you can use to switch:
3.1. Creating a new Ext4 filesystem from the scratch

*

The easiest one, recommended for new installations. Just update your e2fsprogs package to Ext4, and create the filesystem with mkfs.ext4.

3.2. Migrate existing Ext3 filesystems to Ext4

You need to use the tune2fs and fsck tools in the filesystem, and that filesystem needs to be unmounted. Run:

*

tune2fs -O extents,uninit_bg,dir_index /dev/yourfilesystem

After running this command you MUST run fsck. If you don't do it, Ext4 WILL NOT MOUNT your filesystem. This fsck run is needed to return the filesystem to a consistent state. It WILL tell you that it finds checksum errors in the group descriptors - it's expected, and it's exactly what it needs to be rebuilt to be able to mount it as Ext4, so don't get surprised by them. Since each time it finds one of those errors it asks you what to do, always say YES. If you don't want to be asked, add the "-p" parameter to the fsck command, it means "automatic repair":

*

fsck -pf /dev/yourfilesystem

There's another thing that must be mentioned. All your existing files will continue using the old indirect mapping to map all the blocks of data. The online defrag tool will be able to migrate each one of those files to a extent format (using a ioctl that tells the filesystem to rewrite the file with the extent format; you can use it safely while you're using the filesystem normally)
3.3. Mount an existing Ext3 filesystem with Ext4 without changing the format

You can mount an existing Ext3 filesystem with Ext4 but without using features that change the disk format. This means you will be able to mount your filesystem with Ext3 again. You can mount an existing Ext3 filesystem with "mount -t ext4 /dev/yourpartition /mnt". Doing this without having done the conversion process described in the previous point will force Ext4 to not use the features that change the disk format, such as extents, it will use only the features that don't change the file format, such as mballoc or delayed allocation. You'll be able to mount your filesystem as Ext3 again. But obviously you'll be losing the advantages of the Ext4 features that don't get used...

_________________
http://audio.online-convert.com/ <-- excellent site
http://samples.mplayerhq.hu/A-codecs/ <-- Codec Test Files
http://html5games.com/ <-- excellent HTML5 games Smile

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website 
Aitch


Joined: 04 Apr 2007
Posts: 6825
Location: Chatham, Kent, UK

PostPosted: Tue 31 Mar 2009, 05:34    Post subject:  

bump

Hey ttuuxxx

bit surprised at the lack of posts on this

by way of update info, ext4 is now part of the new 2.6.28 kernel, and a patch has already been issued

Quote:
The 2.6.26-ext4-7 patchset has been released. People who are using ext4 wih 2.6.26 should really take this patch.


http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/people/tytso/ext4-patches/2.6.26-ext4-7/

another useful site is:-

http://ext4.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Main_Page

.....and some useful Q&A here:-

http://kubuntuforums.net/forums/index.php?action=printpage;topic=3101763.0

Like all launches, ext4 is not without problems though.....

http://www.h-online.com/open/Ext4-data-loss-explanations-and-workarounds--/news/112892

Updated Kernel adds more fixes & another new FS

http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=290188#290188

'The times they are achangin' - Bob Dylan

Aitch Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
synth


Joined: 18 Mar 2009
Posts: 210

PostPosted: Tue 31 Mar 2009, 08:56    Post subject:  

k2.6.29 has unjournaled Ext4 - much faster.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
steve-in-brazil

Joined: 06 Apr 2009
Posts: 30

PostPosted: Fri 10 Apr 2009, 21:38    Post subject:  

Is the gparted on pupy4.2 deepthought using ext4?

When I first partitioned my hard drive a month ago (first partition experience ever) I didn't know what the terms meant, so i selected ext2, now I wish I'd done ext3, though I probably wouldn't notice the difference from a practical standpoint. should we be switching to 4 already?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
ttuuxxx


Joined: 05 May 2007
Posts: 10747
Location: Ontario Canada,Sydney Australia

PostPosted: Fri 10 Apr 2009, 21:45    Post subject:  

steve-in-brazil wrote:
Is the gparted on pupy4.2 deepthought using ext4?

When I first partitioned my hard drive a month ago (first partition experience ever) I didn't know what the terms meant, so i selected ext2, now I wish I'd done ext3, though I probably wouldn't notice the difference from a practical standpoint. should we be switching to 4 already?

4.2 Gparted doesn't have ext4, That will be a small stumbling block in the future because the latest Gparted uses a lot more Gnome libs then before. Also the kernel has to be patched and also the current kernel in 4.2 can't use ext4, only the latest series kernel can. That will probably be a part of 5.0 series, since we'll need a new kernel, patches, and some sort of way of using it. Parted live also has ext4 in gparted, parted live is a live Linux distro made for disk partitioning.
ttuuxxx

_________________
http://audio.online-convert.com/ <-- excellent site
http://samples.mplayerhq.hu/A-codecs/ <-- Codec Test Files
http://html5games.com/ <-- excellent HTML5 games Smile

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website 
mickee


Joined: 08 Feb 2011
Posts: 212
Location: Saskatoon SK Canada, Gateway 5300 Laptop, 600MHz Celeron, 384MB RAM, lucid puppy 5.2 (Full Install)

PostPosted: Sun 03 Apr 2011, 15:36    Post subject:  

new reply - old post. I see my file system is ext2. Is that ok? should it be ext3 or 4? Can I do a conversion with a full install of puppy? In Windoze, changing the file system can cause loss of data, etc. Is there an easy conversion? Should I even bother? I did hear that if puppy gets shut down unexpectedly in ext3 or 4 then it doesn't always require running fsck. Is that true? Is there a benefit with speed for example on one of the newer fs's? Journalling. Not too sure what that's about...
_________________

Linux is NOT Windows. Doesn't PRETEND to be, Doesn't WANT to be; Don't try to MAKE it be.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger 
Aitch


Joined: 04 Apr 2007
Posts: 6825
Location: Chatham, Kent, UK

PostPosted: Sun 03 Apr 2011, 19:58    Post subject:  

Quote:
4.2 Gparted doesn't have ext4, That will be a small stumbling block in the future because the latest Gparted uses a lot more Gnome libs then before. Also the kernel has to be patched and also the current kernel in 4.2 can't use ext4, only the latest series kernel can. That will probably be a part of 5.0 series, since we'll need a new kernel, patches, and some sort of way of using it. Parted live also has ext4 in gparted, parted live is a live Linux distro made for disk partitioning.
ttuuxxx


Latest Gparted has vastly improved create, move, copy, resize, check, label, and delete partitions for a larger number of filesystems, including ext4

http://gparted.sourceforge.net/features.php

GParted Live can be installed on CD, USB, PXE server, and Hard Disk then run on an x86 machine.

http://gparted.sourceforge.net/livecd.php

Performance comparison of ext2, 3, & 4 here

http://www.delltechcenter.com/page/A+Comparison+of+Ext2,+Ext3+and+Ext4+Performance

mickee

ext3's main advantage over ext2 is journaling [a form of built-in log] which improves reliability and eliminates the need to check the file system after an unclean shutdown. Some users find errors creeping into their pupsaves using ext2, others don't, so unless you have shutdown problems or errors, I wouldn't worry about it. Wait till ext4 is implemented by Barry Wink

Aitch Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
ttuuxxx


Joined: 05 May 2007
Posts: 10747
Location: Ontario Canada,Sydney Australia

PostPosted: Sun 03 Apr 2011, 20:04    Post subject:  

mickee wrote:
new reply - old post. I see my file system is ext2. Is that ok? should it be ext3 or 4? Can I do a conversion with a full install of puppy? In Windoze, changing the file system can cause loss of data, etc. Is there an easy conversion? Should I even bother? I did hear that if puppy gets shut down unexpectedly in ext3 or 4 then it doesn't always require running fsck. Is that true? Is there a benefit with speed for example on one of the newer fs's? Journalling. Not too sure what that's about...

puppy 5 series is really the first that included fsck enabled check as default. Actually it saved my ext3 file system, I usually run 2 series (2.14X) live, and just do a cold shutdown, I've done this hundreds of times with no file system malfunctions what so ever. But about 4 months ago I had one, All my files that I saved on my hard drive weren't assessable we are talking hundreds of gig's, years of stuff. I was pretty nervous that 2.14X couldn't open any of the partitions. But then I remembered that Barry added fsck to Wary, So I figured why not try it, So I made a pupsave on another hard drive with Wary, and booted with the pupsave then did a cold shutdown and rebooted, Wary then did a system check using fsck and BOOM just like that all my files/partitions were back, excellent, I then took a spare 500gb drive I had laying around and made a backup of the files.

So as ext2,3,4 goes, really only puppy 5 has ext4 capabilities, A couple of 4 series releases did have it but most of 4 series was strictly ext 2,3.
If you are only ever going to use series 5 then stick with ext4, If you plan on using, trying out older/newer releases, 2,3,4,5 series then use ext3, really I only use ext3 for all puppy series.
ttuuxxx

_________________
http://audio.online-convert.com/ <-- excellent site
http://samples.mplayerhq.hu/A-codecs/ <-- Codec Test Files
http://html5games.com/ <-- excellent HTML5 games Smile

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website 
rjbrewer


Joined: 22 Jan 2008
Posts: 4422
Location: merriam, kansas

PostPosted: Sun 03 Apr 2011, 22:20    Post subject:  

If you have any 4.xx puppies you won't be able to mount the
5.xx drives that have ext4 format from them.

_________________

Inspiron 700m, Pent.M 1.6Ghz, 1Gb ram.
Msi Wind U100, N270 1.6>2.0Ghz, 1.5Gb ram.
Eeepc 8g 701, 900Mhz, 1Gb ram.
Full installs

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
p310don

Joined: 19 May 2009
Posts: 688
Location: Brisbane, Australia

PostPosted: Sun 03 Apr 2011, 22:53    Post subject:  

Actually ttuuxxx and rjbrewer, FWIW ext4 support was introduced with puppy 4.3 or 4.31, but the ever popular early 4 series didn't have it.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
ttuuxxx


Joined: 05 May 2007
Posts: 10747
Location: Ontario Canada,Sydney Australia

PostPosted: Mon 04 Apr 2011, 00:05    Post subject:  

p310don wrote:
Actually ttuuxxx and rjbrewer, FWIW ext4 support was introduced with puppy 4.3 or 4.31, but the ever popular early 4 series didn't have it.

Thats what I said, sort of kind of Smile
Quote:
A couple of 4 series releases did have it but most of 4 series was strictly ext 2,3.

Also a few others like pupeee which was 4 series, etc.
ttuuxxx

_________________
http://audio.online-convert.com/ <-- excellent site
http://samples.mplayerhq.hu/A-codecs/ <-- Codec Test Files
http://html5games.com/ <-- excellent HTML5 games Smile

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website 
puppyluvr


Joined: 06 Jan 2008
Posts: 3184
Location: Chickasha Oklahoma

PostPosted: Mon 04 Apr 2011, 00:43    Post subject:  

Very Happy Hello,
Older thread, same question...
Still ext3...
Worth looking @ yet????

_________________
Close the Windows, and open your eyes, to a whole new world
http://puppylinuxstuff.meownplanet.net/puppyluvr/
Puppy Linux Users Group on Facebook

Puppy since 2.15CE...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website 
rjbrewer


Joined: 22 Jan 2008
Posts: 4422
Location: merriam, kansas

PostPosted: Mon 04 Apr 2011, 01:32    Post subject:  

p310don wrote:
Actually ttuuxxx and rjbrewer, FWIW ext4 support was introduced with puppy 4.3 or 4.31, but the ever popular early 4 series didn't have it.


People were too busy trying to sort out the 128 - 256 inode
partition problems.

_________________

Inspiron 700m, Pent.M 1.6Ghz, 1Gb ram.
Msi Wind U100, N270 1.6>2.0Ghz, 1.5Gb ram.
Eeepc 8g 701, 900Mhz, 1Gb ram.
Full installs

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
lwill


Joined: 13 Jun 2008
Posts: 173
Location: City Of Lights

PostPosted: Mon 04 Apr 2011, 02:00    Post subject:  

I am glad someone posted in this old thread so I was able to run across it, interesting read.
I knew ext4 is the latest and greatest, but did not know what it's advantages were till now.
I am wandering if anyone can tell me how it compares to XFS on large files.

The reason I ask is I have ran ext2, then later ext3 for root with a large XFS partition on my DVR (MythTV) for video storage since I built it years ago with Fedora Core 2. XFS has been blazing fast deleting large (2G+) files. It is time to do the "Fedora two step" and upgrade again and I was thinking about switching distros. I was happily surprised that I was able to install the front end in lupu-5.25 with out many problems (using ubuntu repo) and thinking that it may be time to try Puppy on it. I had built a puppy version from source a while back, but it was glitchy as it has so many dependencies. (MySQL, at the time QT3, IVTV drivers, LIRC, and on and on)

But back to the point - would it make sense to use ext4 over XFS from now on for better performance and future stability?

Of course there is the problem of 500G+ of files, spread over 2 drives, that I would have to move, unless there is a way to convert XFS -> ext4 ????? Any one know?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website 
Aitch


Joined: 04 Apr 2007
Posts: 6825
Location: Chatham, Kent, UK

PostPosted: Mon 04 Apr 2011, 13:33    Post subject:  

Iwill,

Have a look here -
[note: 2008 test date; ext4 has been updated from ext4dev]

http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=ext4_benchmarks&num=1

xfs is very slow on small file operations while ext3 is very slow
on large file operations.

There's also JFS [it may be 64bit...? check] which has been used for mythTV boxes

http://jfs.sourceforge.net/

http://www.gossamer-threads.com/lists/mythtv/users/367178


Aitch Smile
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
Display posts from previous:   Sort by:   
Page 1 of 2 [17 Posts]   Goto page: 1, 2 Next
Post new topic   Reply to topic View previous topic :: View next topic
 Forum index » Taking the Puppy out for a walk » Announcements
Jump to:  

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
[ Time: 0.1449s ][ Queries: 12 (0.0078s) ][ GZIP on ]