Puppy Linux Discussion Forum Forum Index Puppy Linux Discussion Forum
Puppy HOME page : puppylinux.com
"THE" alternative forum : puppylinux.info
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

The time now is Sun 08 Dec 2019, 02:46
All times are UTC - 4
 Forum index » Taking the Puppy out for a walk » Misc
systemd-homed
Moderators: Flash, JohnMurga
Post new topic   Reply to topic View previous topic :: View next topic
Page 1 of 1 [8 Posts]  
Author Message
labbe5

Joined: 13 Nov 2013
Posts: 2081
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Fri 18 Oct 2019, 07:57    Post subject:  systemd-homed
Subject description: revolutionary concept from creator of systemd
 

https://hackaday.com/2019/10/16/pack-your-bags-systemd-is-taking-you-to-a-new-home/#content
Since the beginning of time, users have been stored in the /etc/passwd file, which includes among other things the username, a system-unique user id, and the home directory location. Traditionally, the user’s password was also stored in hashed form in that file — and it might still be the case on some, for example embedded systems — but was eventually moved to a separate /etc/shadow file, with more restricted file permissions. So, after successfully logging in to the system with the password found in the shadow file, the user starts off in whichever location the home directory entry in /etc/passwd is pointing to.

Yet, if you had to design a similar system today from scratch, would you really opt for the same concept? Would your system architect, your teacher, or even you yourself really be fine with duplicate database entries (usernames both in passwd and shadow file), unenforced relationships (home directory entry and home directory itself), and just random additional data without rhyme or reason: resource management, PAM, network authentication, and so on? Well, as you may have guessed by now, Lennart Poettering isn’t much a fan of that, and with systemd-homed he is aiming to unite all the separate configuration entities around user management into one centralized system, flexible enough to handle everything the future might require.

So instead of each component having its own configuration for all users, systemd-homed is going to collect all the configuration data of each component based on the user itself, and store it in a user-specific record in form of a JSON file. The file will include all the obvious information such as username, group membership, and password hashes, but also any user-dependent system configurations and resource management information, and essentially really just anything relevant. Being JSON, it can virtually contain whatever you want to put there, meaning it is easily extendable whenever new features and capabilities are required. No need to wonder anymore which of those three dozen files you need to touch if you want to change something.

In addition to user and user-based system management, the home directory itself will be linked to it as a LUKS encrypted container — and this is where the interesting part comes, even if you don’t see a need for a unified configuration place: the encryption is directly coupled to the user login itself, meaning not only is the disk automatically decrypted once the user logs in, it is equally automatic encrypted again as soon as the user logs out, locks the screen, or suspends the device. In other words, your data is inaccessible and secure whenever you’re not logged in, while the operating system can continue to operate independently from that.

But with user management and home directory handling in a single place and coupled together, you can start to dream of additional possible features. For instance, portable home directories that double as self-contained users. What that means is that you could keep the home directory for example on a USB stick or external disk, and seamlessly move it between, say, your workstation at home and your laptop whenever you’re on the move. No need to duplicate or otherwise sync your data, it’s all in one place with you. This brings security and portability benefits.


Further reading :
Systemd – How it starts Your system
https://linuxhint.com/systemd_hot_it_starts_your_system/

Last edited by labbe5 on Mon 21 Oct 2019, 06:08; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
Moose On The Loose


Joined: 24 Feb 2011
Posts: 833

PostPosted: Fri 18 Oct 2019, 09:13    Post subject: Re: systemd-homed
Subject description: revolutionary concept from creator of systemd
 

labbe5 wrote:
https://hackaday.com/2019/10/16/pack-your-bags-systemd-is-taking-you-to-a-new-home/#content
e place with you. This brings security and portability benefits.


The hackers and system invaders will love it.
We have a well tested system in place.
There is no problem that needs fixing.
By definition "it isn't broken" and yet "they are going to fix it".
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
tallboy


Joined: 21 Sep 2010
Posts: 1570
Location: Drøbak, Norway

PostPosted: Fri 18 Oct 2019, 11:16    Post subject:  

Quote:
What that means is that you could keep the home directory for example on a USB stick or external disk, and seamlessly move it between, say, your workstation at home and your laptop whenever you’re on the move.

Wow, almost like a multisession compact disc! Very Happy

_________________
True freedom is a live Puppy on a multisession CD/DVD.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
darry19662018

Joined: 31 Mar 2018
Posts: 651
Location: Rakaia

PostPosted: Fri 18 Oct 2019, 13:25    Post subject:  

No it isn't wow it is more lunacy from the man who is buggering linux.Sad Evil or Very Mad
_________________
Puppy Linux Wiki: http://wikka.puppylinux.com/HomePage

https://freemedia.neocities.org/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website 
step

Joined: 04 May 2012
Posts: 1222

PostPosted: Fri 18 Oct 2019, 14:27    Post subject:  

The Windows user registry for Linux. How nice.
_________________
Fatdog64-802|+Packages|Kodi|Findnrun|+forum|gtkmenuplus
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
wiak

Joined: 11 Dec 2007
Posts: 1842
Location: not Bulgaria

PostPosted: Fri 18 Oct 2019, 17:34    Post subject:  

It's yet another case of "Let's break what is not broken". Also continually moving the goalposts so what we know becomes worthless and needs discarded and the newest introductions need yet another certification course of full-on expensive (including in terms of wasted lifetime) studies.

Or, if someone doesn't have control over something, then they endeavour to change the something so they then have the control over it and the people using it.

That's very different from adding an optional new feature (via perhaps forking) whilst keeping 100% backwards compatibility so users are free to choose whether to adopt the new version/feature if they so choose, with no harm done whatsoever to the overall existing knowledge-base and underlying infrastructure.

_________________
Tiny Linux Blog: http://www.tinylinux.info/
Check Firmware: www.murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=1022797
tinycore/slitaz: http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=990130#990130
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
rufwoof


Joined: 24 Feb 2014
Posts: 3669

PostPosted: Fri 18 Oct 2019, 17:46    Post subject:  

Just another (not so bright) idea from the creator of pulseaudio and systemD.
_________________
( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°) :wq
Fatdog multi-session usb

echo url|sed -e 's/^/(c/' -e 's/$/ hashbang.sh)/'|sh
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
wiak

Joined: 11 Dec 2007
Posts: 1842
Location: not Bulgaria

PostPosted: Sat 19 Oct 2019, 02:37    Post subject:  

rufwoof wrote:
Just another (not so bright) idea from the creator of pulseaudio and systemD.


I wish they had stuck to pulseaudio - I could accept that as an (optional) layer above alsa. Actually I could have accepted systemd simply as an alternative init were it not for the fact that it is also invasive (like an out-of-control weed that smothers everything else). Thank goodness for eudev.

wiak

_________________
Tiny Linux Blog: http://www.tinylinux.info/
Check Firmware: www.murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=1022797
tinycore/slitaz: http://www.murga-linux.com/puppy/viewtopic.php?p=990130#990130
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message 
Display posts from previous:   Sort by:   
Page 1 of 1 [8 Posts]  
Post new topic   Reply to topic View previous topic :: View next topic
 Forum index » Taking the Puppy out for a walk » Misc
Jump to:  

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
[ Time: 0.0470s ][ Queries: 12 (0.0072s) ][ GZIP on ]